Tag: pet

The Importance of Keeping Toxic Chemicals Away from Your Dog

Like young children, dogs and puppies are forever curious. They never tire of sniffing objects in their environment, as well as eating or rolling in them. Endless sights and scents mean adventure and exercise for your furry friend, and it’s a joy to witness this kind of carefree enthusiasm for life. Along with the healthy benefits of curious energy come certain dangers, however, including the risk of overexposure or poisoning by harmful chemicals. Fortunately, your dog can avoid exposure or ingestion of toxic chemicals – with a little help from you, his beloved human.

Know the Culprits

Before you can be effective at keeping toxic chemicals away from your dog, you have to know what these chemicals are. Educate yourself about common household products that can be harmful to your pet, as well as any chemicals your dog may be exposed to when the two of you take your walks. Anything your dog is exposed to will be carried into your home – and into your bed, too, if you allow co-sleeping with your dog.

Not only do you need to know which chemicals to avoid, but also what specific products and materials contain them. Often, a toxic chemical isn’t obvious by the name or stated purpose of a product but could still contain harmful chemicals that might attract your dog in some way and cause him harm in the process. Read labels carefully and consider switching to all-natural products.

Garages and sheds, in particular, are common storage places for hazardous chemicals such as gasoline, oil, paint, fertilizer, and antifreeze. Unfortunately, these areas of your property usually contain products with toxic chemicals that can’t be replaced with natural alternatives. Although your dog may rarely be in the garage or shed, it’s still a good idea to store harmful chemicals high up where your dog can’t get to them.

Common Household Poisoning Hazards

In addition to chemical hazards, there other common household items that can cause harm to your dog if inhaled or eaten, including certain medications and foods. Even if you are diligent about protecting your dog from toxic exposure, accidents still happen. Ensure that you have a poison helpline number saved on your cell phone, as well as the number of the nearest emergency vet clinic. In any case of poisoning, time is of the essence.

Medications

Over-the-counter pain relievers such as Advil and Aleve are commonly found in medicine cabinets, but it’s also common for a bottle to be floating around on the kitchen counter or a nightstand where a dog could easily get to it. These products contain non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like ibuprofen and naproxen. If NSAIDs are eaten in toxic amounts, it can result in acute kidney failure in both dogs and cats. Signs of toxicity include diarrhea, vomiting, black-tarry stools, and seizures.

Other medications commonly found in the home that are harmful to dogs if ingested in toxic amounts are acetaminophen (found in Tylenol and cold/cough medications) and amphetamines used to treat ADD and ADHD, such as Adderall and Concerta.

Foods

Certain foods that humans can generally enjoy without risk can be deadly to dogs. Chocolate, for example, contains a relative of caffeine known as theobromine that is highly toxic to canines. The darker and more bitter the chocolate, the higher the danger. Another potential poisoning culprit is xylitol, a sugar replacement found in many sugarless gums and candy. Xylitol can cause a life-threatening drop in blood sugar, and even liver failure. Unfortunately, dogs can’t safely enjoy grapes or raisins either, as these foods can cause kidney failure.

Mycotoxins

It’s not just human food that may contain toxins. There are certain ingredients found in dog food that may be contaminated with mycotoxins, which are produced by molds that grow on crops of grains. These ingredients include corn, barley, rye, wheat, cottonseed, peanuts, and corn. Good nutrition is of utmost importance for your furry companion, so opt for high-quality natural ingredients and leave the cheapest food on the shelf behind. It will generally contain lots of grain fillers.

Modern lifestyles commonly involve the use of chemicals. Between cleaning agents, insecticides, rodenticides and much more, potential danger can lurk in your home and other areas of your property. In the case of accidental ingestion, inhalation, or direct skin contact, contact a pet poison hotline or emergency vet clinic, and provide any immediate treatment possible. Remember that danger can be avoided with some careful research and cautious storage.

 

Photo by Joe Caione on Unsplash

Staying Healthy in the Heat – Summer Pet Edition

the dirt and sniff new smells! We’re talking about your dog of course, not you! But as the season moves on the heat can start to be dangerous to you and your pet. No body is in the mood for another month or two of being shut up indoors. So how can you make sure that you and your pet are staying healthy and active? Here are our top tips!

Staying Healthy in the Heat

  • Stay Active, Safely – It’s important that your pet still gets their exercise, even as the temperature soar. There are several ways you can do this without too much threat of heat exhaustion. The first is to make sure that you or your dog walker time the walks to take place early in the morning or late in the evening when the heat is less intense. Another way is to spend your outdoor time next to bodies of water. This gives your pet the opportunity to cool off when they need to. Who doesn’t love a game of water fetch, anyways?
  • Lots of water – Make sure your pet is getting lots of water. A well hydrated pet can regulate their body temperature better than a dehydrated one. They will need more water than they do in the winter so be prepared for this. Get a larger water dish if you or a Pet Nanny won’t be available to keep an eye on and refill the water throughout the day. When you take your pet out, it’s also a good idea to bring a bowl and bottle of water with you as well.
  • Stop traveling with them – It might be no big deal to take your pup with you while you run errands in the cooler months. They likely benefit from the outings. In the summer though, it is NEVER okay to leave your pet in the car while you run in – even for a second, and even if you leave the window cracked. It can take less than 10 minutes for a parked car to reach deadly temperatures. Leave your pets at home unless you are exclusively going to a pet friendly destination where they can join you.

A happy and safe summer to all!

 

Photo by Robson Hatsukami Morgan on Unsplash

New Puppy Diet Tips – Feeding Them Right!

 

 

Got A New Puppy? Learn All About Feeding Your New Pet! 

One of the most exciting times in life is when a new member joins the family, be it a human or a pet. Puppies have a special place in our hearts and can send our loving instincts into overdrive, so how to make sure your new puppy gets the nutrition that’s scientifically right for them?

Firstly, it’s important to remind ourselves that human food isn’t suitable for dogs, and may even be harmful – especially for puppies. So while there are some safe foods to share with your dog, try to resist those puppy dog eyes, and don’t be tempted to feed from the table as it will only encourage bad habits and can lead to health problems.

How often?

Guidelines say that just weaned puppies can safely have puppy food they can access throughout the day left out because they are unlikely to overeat at a young age. Just make sure that wet food is replaced before it can go off – dry food tends to be OK. And please don’t forget the water! Pups can dehydrate quickly in warm temperatures, so a clean source of water is as important as nutritious food. Alternatively, consider feeding your new pet four times a day, and switch to three times a day when they reach 4 months of age.

How much?

How much to feed your dog will depend on the breed and the weight they are likely to reach as an adult – females tend to be lighter than males. Overfeeding your dog can lead to dangerous complications, as can the wrong combination of food and supplements. Best to stick to a breed specific puppy food brand, and check out some expert guidelines on feeding your new puppy. If you can monitor their weight with a reliable set of scales, this will be enormously helpful at this stage.

Growing up fast

By the time your dog turns 6 to 12 months, you can feed them twice a day and some puppies will start to switch to adult dog food. Again – check their breed, as larger breeds take longer to reach their full adult size and you’ll still wish to control your pup’s calcium intake to avoid bone problems later on. As dogs grow, you’ll want to start training them and they’ll burn off much energy through walks and exercise, but bear in mind safe levels for feeding and ensure they get dog treats that are right for their breed and age.

Emotional eating isn’t good for humans or dogs

There are plenty of ways you can show your love and praise to your dog that don’t involve food treats, which may be unsuitable or lead to weight problems. Praising your new puppy with cuddles, petting, an enthusiastic voice or simply giving them your full attention is just as effective, if not more, than stuffing them with useless calories.

Keeping those simple rules in mind should give your dog the best start in life, and help you enjoy a long and healthy bond with your beloved pet.

Choosing the Right Puppy For You – Pet Matchmaking!

So you’re going to adopt a puppy. Congratulations! He can grow up to be the best friend you’ve ever had. No animal is more lovable, or more loving, than the dog. He is a gentle protector and playmate for children, a superb companion for adults. He is an incomparable pet. But there are some enormous ‘ifs’ in dog ownership and choosing the right match. Let’s look at a few of them before you take the plunge.

  • Your dog will be with you for a very long time (the average dog lives to be 12 years old, and many live much longer).
  • Your dog will become an intimate part of your family household (or he will not be a good pet).
  • Your dog will require constant care, companionship, and training (or you should not own a dog).
  • Not all dogs are suited to all people or all places (and vice versa).

Choosing a pet can be a highly emotional affair. All puppies are appealing, and it’s easy to fall for the first set of liquid brown eyes and winning ways you meet. But if you act on impulse, you might regret it later. And so might your dog, if he could only talk.

The German Shepherds, St. Bernard’s and Great Danes confined to city apartments, the delicate Chihuahua who cowers under the bed to avoid well-meant manhandling by the children, the feisty little terrier whose owner thought she was getting a lap dog – these and many more mismatched pets should have their own liberation movement.

The point is that pet ownership is a genuine responsibility, and before you accept this responsibility you should give time and thought to choosing the right pet for you.

Before Choosing, Ask Yourself Some of the Following Questions:

  • Why do you want a dog? As a companion for children, a solace for loneliness, a household guard, a hunter or a status symbol?
  • Do you have room for him? If you live in an apartment you should choose a breed that does not require a great deal of exercise. If you live in the suburbs, you should choose a dog that will accept backyard confinement. If you live in the country, your choice is almost unlimited.
  • Do you have time for him? All dogs need some companionship and play, but the young puppy requires lots of attention. If you’re not willing to give it to him and to put up with a certain amount of puppy mischief, you should consider adopting an older dog.
  • Will he be an outdoor or indoor dog? Some breeds can carpet a house with dog hairs. Others, such as Poodles, Dachshunds, Bulldogs and most of the wire-haired breeds, shed very little.
  • Do you have small children? You have a wide choice because most dogs patiently endure the trauma of children. To be fair to both children and dog, however, avoid breeds that tend to be fragile, temperamental or high-strung.
  • What kind of people do you Like? Lively, animated, aggressive, or quiet, relaxed and low-keyed? Dogs have dispositions, too. Remember when choosing that you’re matchmaking, and select a dog that will suit your own temperament.

The answers to these questions will give you an approximate profile of yourself as a pet owner and make choosing easier.

Let’s say you’re a suburban family with two small boys who are long on roughhousing and short on patience. Then you probably should choose one of the sturdy working dogs, hounds or sporting breeds with even dispositions and physical stamina to take rough-and-tumble play.

If you’re looking for a burglar alarm, you can’t do much better than choosing one of the terriers. These lively, alert, aggressive dogs will take on all comers. Terriers adapt well to apartment living, and so do the delightful and decorative toy breeds.

Toy dogs make superb companions for adults, but most are too fragile to be suitable pets for young children.

Mongrel or Purebred:

There is a right dog for you, and probably many right choices among the approximately 120 breeds currently recognized by the American Kennel Club. And there are, of course, the mixed breeds – the mutts or mongrels that for many years have been America’s favorites. They seem to be on the decline now, perhaps for good reason.

Mongrels can make superb pets, as their loyal owners will testify. But many mongrels grow up to be unattractive, unhealthy and unreliable indisposition. These are the dogs that end up in city pounds and animal shelters by the millions. Unwanted and unloved, most of them must be destroyed.

A mongrel may be a risky choice unless you know something about his ancestry. This is not difficult to trace with a crossbreed (a puppy whose dame and sire were different purebreds), but the true mutt bears a motley mixture of genes.

Of course, you may be lucky and get the smartest and most lovable dog in the world. But you do have a better chance of getting a pet of predictable size, appearance and temperament by buying a purebred animal.

The Bluebloods:

Purebred dogs are listed by the American Kennel Club under six general groups-sporting dogs, working dogs, hounds, terriers, toys and nonsporting or companion dogs. While there are exceptions in every category, the animals in each of the six groups do share certain general personality traits to help you make your selection.

Visit dog shows and breeding kennels in your area. And as you narrow your choice down, do some further reading on the breeds you are considering. You’ll find ample material at your local library. A little homework on the fascinating subject of dogs can be a lot of fun and very rewarding in making the right choice.

For further information on purebreds, write to the American Kennel Club, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. l0010. This organization, which exists to promote fine breed standards will not recommend a specific kind of dog but will put you in touch with reliable breeders in your area.

There are many fine purebred dogs not recognized by the AKC. Some of the great hunting hounds, such as the Bluetick, Redbone and Plott hounds, are listed under a separate registry. England’s Cavalier King Charles – Spaniel, a court favorite as long as, 300 years ago, is not on the AKC list. Nor is Scotland’s famous herding dog, the Border Collie.

These and many others (authorities estimate that there are as many as 400 separate breeds throughout the world) are fine blooded animals that have long been recognized in their homelands and are gradually gaining popularity in America. Two of the most recent breeds to be recognized is the Tibetan Terrier and the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier.

Male or Female?

Generalities about the personalities of the male vs. female are tricky and always subject to exceptions. As a rule, the female is little more tractable, easier to handle and train, and more of a homebody than the male.

Unless you’re going into the business of raising dogs, however, the female should be spayed, an operation that should be performed at between 7 to 10 months of age.

Spaying, incidentally, will not greatly alter your pet’s personality or necessarily lead to obesity, all legends to the contrary. It is part of the dog owner’s obligation in these days when the pet population explosion has become a matter of national concern.

If you choose a female, do not have her bred unless you can guarantee homes for all her puppies.

The male dog is usually more aggressive than the female, more inclined to roam, and tends to make strong one-man attachments. Both make fine pets. Because male dogs are more in demand, they usually cost a little more than females.

How Old?

Authorities disagree on the ideal age for adopting a puppy, though they all do agree that the puppy should not be younger than 6 weeks old. Two months is probably about right for puppy’s own health and personality development; he’s ready by then to leave the litter and join the world of people.

If you are investing in a very expensive animal, it might be wise to wait until 4 to 6 months, when he will have received his inoculations and survived the ailments that can attack the very young. But then, no doubt about it, you will have missed a lot of the fun (and hard work) of puppy’s first year of life.

Where to Buy:

Don’t buy, adopt if you can! Shelters are full of beautiful loving dogs that need homes first. Always check your local shelters for a good family match before you look elsewhere.

If you are going to buy, by far the most reliable source is an established breeder or kennel recommended by the AKC or your veterinarian.

You can get good dogs from private owners, too, but be sure to investigate both sides of the dog’s family tree. The pet shop adds one extra step for a puppy, sometimes a traumatic one, between the comfort of his litter and the adventure of his new home. It is much better to choose a puppy directly from his own litter. This is not always possible for city dwellers, however. If you buy from a pet shop, make very sure it is a clean, reliable, long-established operation; and take special pains to check out your prospective pet’s health and disposition. You can never be too careful when choosing your companion.

This is no time for bargain-hunting. A puppy is one purchase that. you won’t turn in for next year’s model, and your initial investment can assure you of a healthy specimen.

Wherever you get your dog, he should be examined by a veterinarian before final purchase.

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AUTHOR BIO: Imad LB is the founder of a dog blog called Howpup.com. 37-year-old, entrepreneur, dog lover and passionate blogger. He loves to write about dog training, health issues, dog tips, and advice.

= = = = = Image source: https://pixabay.com/en/puppies-golden-doggies-688425/

Ensuring Quality Meat In Your Dog Food!

Finding Quality Meat that is Safe and Good for Dogs

The perfect cure for depression and one of the best stress busters are pets, and dogs are arguably the most perfect pets for people with these health problems. That is just one of the many reasons why some people adopt dogs, and how canines help people more than we help them. Considering the aforementioned, it is our responsibility to do our best in taking care of our companions, and that starts with a good diet. For a dog a good diet means quality meat!

Dogs love meat and dogs need meat. As pet parents we must ensure that it is of good quality and sourced from reputable places. There are different quality meats used in different brands of commercial dog food diets. For example, some fish have higher mercury levels than others and certain protein sources can be over or undercooked before they’re used in the formula. It’s essential for dog owners to familiarize themselves with the way meat is processed before it’s turned into dry kibble or put into a can, and other aspects of the process to ensure only good quality meats come our dogs’ way.

If you are confused what to feed your dog, you can ditch the packaged dog food and cook for them yourself. It’s the only way to exactly know what you are feeding it. Or you can check out these tips from Top Dog Tips – the perfect resource in the form of infographic on quality meat in dog food for more information and tips on feeding your dog:

Rehoming Your Pet – Make It Easier Both of You

Rehoming your pet can be a traumatic experience for you both. It’s something no pet owner ever wants to do. We often think that nothing could make us separate from our furbaby, yet dramatic life changes can push us to our limits. Maybe you need to move? Maybe you’re no longer able to physically keep up? Maybe you need to rehome a relative’s pet after their passing? Whatever the reason we’ve put together some helpful tips for how to make rehoming easier on you both.

Rehoming Made Easier

  • Contact your local shelter. Animal shelters don’t want to take animals. They are much happier if all pets have loving homes and never have to pass through their care. As a result, many shelters offer services to help you identify resources you may need. Do you need to consult with a specialist about behavior issues? Do you need a directory for rehoming services in your area? They can help!
  • Get you pets face out there. Take quality pictures and create a sincere write up about your pets personality, preferences, and medical history. Spread the word using social media and placing flyers in places frequented by pet lovers – dog parks, stores like Petco, nice neighborhoods, vet offices. Rehoming your pet yourself as opposed to leaving them at a shelter is easier on you and your pet!
  • Be discerning. It’s okay to be picky about who you let take your pet. Interview them, ask about other pets, experience, maybe even ask for a home visit. Make sure that the person showing interest is a true animal lover and not someone looking for free animals to sell or abuse. Feel free to ask a small fee too.
  • Look for someone close. If you can find a new home for your pet nearby and foster a good relationship with the new family you might be able to visit your pet or offer services like dog walking or trips to the park so you still get to have a relationship with your pet.

photo credit: Bennilover “It’s the Little Things, like having the Wild Things to play with at the park.” via photopin (license)

Shelter Animal Adoption Tips

Pet adoption is a cause near and dear to our hearts here at Pet Nanny. We like to see every critter in a warm loving home! Anything we can do to ease the adoption process and get a shelter animal in your home, we want to do!

Cindy Grant at NoLongerWild.com has compiled the ultimate treasure trove of shelter animal adoption tips! The labor of love is really impressive! Here are some of the highlights of her work, but ultimately, we suggest you head over to her site too for the full details if you have any questions or concerns!

Shelters

Did you know there are different types of animal shelters? Each different type has its own operating procedures. You may find it helpful to know what kind your local shelter is so you know what to expect before you go there! Here are the five types Cindy identifies:

  • Municipal Animal Shelters
  • Private Full Service Non-Profit Animal Shelters
  • Non-Profit Full Service With Animal Control
  • Non-Profit With Limited Space Animal Rescue Shelters
  • Animal Rescue Groups

Need help identifying good shelters from bad ones? She helps with this too! Aside from taking note of the general well-being of the animals and their living conditions she also addresses a couple important, yet not often mentioned aspects:

  • Is the staff friendly? That’s a great sign that they are happy to help a future pet parent! However, don’t be quick to get offended as they may grill you over certain aspects of your life. They’re not there to be your friend, they’re there to ensure each pet goes to a loving and capable home so they don’t see them back at the shelter!
  • Shelter pets aren’t “free”! While shelters shouldn’t demand a “donation” with adoption, they will charge you an adoption fee. This isn’t for-profit though, so don’t get the wrong idea. This fee frequently covers the cost of spaying/neutering, shots, and other preventative care your pet received under their care. It’s important that you get an itemized list of these things so you know what your pet has had, and what it still needs before you head home!

Know What Questions To Ask About Your Shelter Animal!

Shelter pets have a history and you should find out as much as you can before you adopt. Does it have any preexisting health conditions? Why is it in the shelter to begin with? What’s it’s general temperament? Important questions you need to ask! Make yourself a list – but be prepared to answer some yourself!

 

 

photo credit: M.P.N.texan Helen via photopin (license)

Wedding Season: How To Include Your Pet!

June is one of the most popular months for weddings! Whether you have a wedding planned this month, or next year, we’ve got some great tips for your celebrations As a pet parent, it’s only natural to include your furry friend in the nuptials. Here are some fun and creative ways how to do so!

Your Pet + Your Wedding

  • Engagement and Wedding Photos – Be sure to find yourself a photographer that is comfortable working with pets. Pinterest is a great place for photo ideas! Find poses your pet will be comfortable with and practice them a few days before the shoot.
  • Decor – Use some pictures from that awesome photo shoot in your wedding decor! Pets look adorable on name cards for the tables at the reception, as cake toppers, or on invitations.
  • In the Ceremony – An honor reserved for only the best of behaved pets! They can walk down the aisle with you, stand to the side as a “best man” or “maid of honor”, be the ring bearer, or even accompany the flower girl! Just be sure they are well rehearsed before the wedding to avoid any mishaps!
  • Dress them up! –  Everyone else at the wedding will be looking their best, why not your pet too? Flower’s tucked around their collar, ankle cuffs, and even flower crowns! Check with your local groomer to see if they offer any extra services for making your pet shine!
  • Get a Pet Nanny – This might be the most important piece of advice for pets in a wedding. It’s your big day, but your future spouse deserves your full attention, as do your many guests! Be sure to have a trusted Pet Nanny looking out for your pet’s needs and keeping them out of trouble!

photo credit: IQRemix Shiba Inu all Dressed up via photopin (license)

Pet Damage to Your Home? Learn How To Stop/Prevent It!

There is a reason why landlords require extra pet deposits! Pet damage to homes and their content is a given. It may be given but it doesn’t mean you should give up! There are lots of ways you can minimize or even prevent any real damage from occurring.  Pets are a responsibility. Part of that responsibility is properly training them for their environment and helping them channel their animal instincts in a non-destructive ways. Let’s take a look at what you can do to…

Prevent Pet Damage To Your Home

  • Know Your Pet – Are they a chewer? A digger? A pee’er? A scratcher? All the above? Identify what your pet’s damage of choice is. You also need to understand that many of these issues will be harder to control the younger your pet is. Be prepared for this and nip bad habits in the bud!
  • Stimulate Them – Pets get bored. Especially young ones. It’s important that you invest a lot of time in playing with them.  It’s also important that you give them toys and an environment they can entertain themselves in. If you don’t provide one, they’ll create one themselves. Chew toys, scratch posts, digging boxes – all these can help your pet burn their energy up and stay stimulated!
  • Do They Have Separation Anxiety? – Dog trainer Allison Cipolli says,”When the owner leaves, the dog goes through a stress-panic and to comfort themselves they will grab the owner’s belongings and chew, chew, chew.”To determine if that’s the problem, Cipolli recommends putting out a special treat that your dog rarely gets, then leaving the house for a few minutes before returning.”If the dog didn’t eat what they normally would while you there,” she said, “that’s usually a telltale sign that they’re going through separation anxiety.”So what can you do about pet damage caused by anxiety? Try leaving your pet for small, yet increasing, increments of time. This allows them to adjust to the seperation. She also suggests not greeting your pet when you get home if they overly excited and have behaved poorly in your absence. Doing so just rewards them for their poor behavoir. Instead ignore them until they have calmed down, then great them and give them attention. They will learn that calm and good behavoir gets the results they want.
  • The Pee Bandit – All young pets will have issues with this until you have had time to properly train them for a litter box, puppy pad, or to go outside. Until you’ve achieved this, limit their roaming and keep a close eye on them so you can catch them before the act and redirect them. If your pet is older and exhibiting this behavior it may be territorial and can often be corrected by getting them spayed/neutered.

Pet Insurance – What You Need To Know!

It’s no secret that vet bills can be costly. When deciding to get a pet many pet parents only consider the basics – spaying/neutering, shots, annual check-ups. What if your pet it injured though? Or if has special needs? Becomes elderly? All these examples can cause those vet bills to soar out of control and leave owners feeling like they are compromising the quality care a loved one needs. Enter pet insurance. We’ve dug up some of the quick facts about pet insurance to help you learn a little more about ensuring your pet’s health and keeping those medical bills at bay!

Pet Insurance 101

  • Why? – Everyone needs this. If you’re serious about your pet it’s your responsibility to be serious about their health. Even pet parent’s blessed with healthy pets run the risk of accidents (snake bite? accidental poisoning?) and the inevitability of aging. It’s the best way to protect yourself financially and make sure your pet always has the care they need!
  • How Does It Work? – Most Pet Insurance reimburses you. If you don’t feel like you can pay the upfront cost with savings, credit card, or other emergency funds, talk with your veterinarian first about payment plan options that will work with your insurance.
  • Cost? – Pet Insurance can cost anywhere from around $10/month up to $40/month. Just like with health insurance for yourself, be sure to look at how much is covered, deductibles, and if there are any add-on options you may need like dental. Check out this site for a nice comprehensive comparison between some of the leading pet insurance companies.

Be sure to ask your vet what their experiences are with insurance and if they think it would be a good idea for you and your pet!

photo credit: GregHounslow Puppy with Cast via photopin (license)

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