Tag: pet care

Kids Growing Up With Pets – Here’s Why Its Good!

Have your kids been pestering you to get them a pet? Have you been pondering over the decision for quite some time now? Then it is time you to act! To help you with your decision here is a beautiful infographic that will explain all about the benefits of children growing up with pets. Having a pet along with young children can be an added responsibility for you, but consider the lifetime of benefits that your children will get by adding a cute, happy, playful, loyal, protective, watchful, sensitive, and loving entity to your family! How many reasons do you need to make the leap? How about 25!

Several types of research have been conducted, and are going to be conducted in the future, regarding the various benefits that kids get by having a pet at home. Some of the important conclusions that these studies have come up with are; the kids who grow up with pets have increased levels of immunity, they learn their responsibilities early in their life. They are also often happier than those without pets. They learn to respect other beings. These children will also be more active and pet ownership helps in keeping serious diseases such as heart conditions and obesity at bay. There are many more advantages, please check out this infographic from Top Dog Tips to get the full details.

25 Reasons Kids Should Have Pets!

 

9 Ways Pets Help Raise Good, Healthy Kids

As kids get older, they find themselves having friends who own pets. From dogs and cats to birds and hamsters, its inevitable they will be asking their parents if they, too, can become pet owners. With pet ownership being a big responsibility, some parents hesitate on giving their blessing. However, as scientists have done research on the benefits of pet ownership as it pertains to children, you might find yourself more eager than ever to drive to the local pet store or animal shelter. There are numerous ways pets help children!

If you have found that your children have had more than their share of ailments, owning a pet could change all that. Based on research published in the Journal of Pediatrics, kids who had pets in their home while they were infants were found to have 31 percent fewer respiratory infections and 44 percent fewer ear infections. When looking for a reason to explain this, scientists determined that being pets help expose them to dirt, dander, and pollen made the children’s immune systems much stronger at an early age, making it a bit easier to clean up after Fido or Fluffy.

And speaking of cleaning up after pets, kids who own pets have also been found to grow up to become very responsible adults. According to researchers, owning pets that they are responsible for feeding, grooming, playing with, and cleaning up after on a daily basis shows children the importance of responsibility, organizational skills, and maintaining a regular daily schedule.

But if you’re more interested in having a child who’s a great student, you’ll be happy to know pets help contribute to this as well. According to the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, kids who own pets are much more self-confident, have higher self-esteem, and are better able to make friends and perform better in school, particularly in literacy. By having pets who willingly sit and listen to them read while not criticizing them for an occasional mistake, children’s confidence levels go sky high.

If you need even more reasons why its great for kids to own pets, pay a visit to www.catological.com/9-ways-pets-help-raise-kids/

9 Ways Pets Help Raise Good, Healthy Kids

Vaccine Boosters – What Your Pet Needs and When

You may think the time for vaccines has passed once your pet is all grown up. Not so! If you want to keep your pet in peak health it’s important to get regular check-ups and a booster vaccine from time to time. How do you keep this straight though? What does your pet need and when? These questions become even more complex if you are taking on a new pet that is already an adult.

Most pets that come from shelters will have had a vaccine or two. It’s super important when there are so many animals in such a close environment as a shelter. Before you adopt, be sure to ask about your potential new pets medical history. Their known vaccine history should be included. Get a copy and be sure to take it to vet for the first check up. This will help them know what your pet needs and what it doesn’t.

Some vaccines may not be important for pet, depending on their lifestyle. Shots for things like the dog flue and kennel cough are super important for dogs that come into regular contact with other dogs. If your pets don’t frequent dog parks or socialize on a large scale, these may be less important. A vaccine for Lyme’s disease can be super important for dogs that spend time outside. If you have a delicate dog or a house cat though, chances of them contracting it are pretty slim (it’ comes from tick bites).

Save these two great infographics that detail your dog or cats vaccination needs from the start of their life on. It includes the boosters they will need to get after so many years and annually. Be sure to ask your vet about the need for seasonal vaccines too – such as the dog flu!

 

Pet Vaccine Schedules

 

 

 

 

Pet Posture – Decoding Your Dog With Pet Nanny

Over time, dog owners will gradually develop an innate understanding with their pets. This communication between human and canine is near-telepathic. However, it can often happen that the signals and posture from your dog are misinterpreted. It can be a source of great annoyance for the animal.

How can we tell that a dog is content and relaxed? One clear sign is them having their mouth open (unless you’re eating, in which case the dog is demanding to be fed!). A head-up, tail-down posture with its ears raised backwards also indicates that everything is fine. Wagging tails are usually interpreted as a sign that the dog is happy. If this is accompanied by its ears being pinned back or on their sides, it’s more likely that the animal feels frightened.

It’s also well worth knowing when a dog is liable to become aggressive. This is especially important if you have not encountered it before. If the dog has its teeth bared, has its hackles up and is standing tall on its back legs, these hint at the potential for aggression.  As does a tense posture, stiff tail movement or the tail being positioned between its legs. A fearful pose, where its body is lowered and its ears are pinned back, is also one of which to be wary.

Listen carefully to the dog’s barking, too. A high-pitched, drawn-out woof usually signifies that the dog is relaxed and carefree. On the other hand, a quick spate of low-pitched barks repeated frequently is a sign that the dog is in an alert state that could become aggressive.

This infographic from Greyhounds as Pets explains a wide variety of body language signals from dogs.  It attempts to help people understand these signals correctly. Knowing how a dog is feeling can enable us to communicate with it more effectively.

Decoding Dog Posture

Cat Questions Answered! Why Does….

If you’ve got yourself a cat, chances are you’ve probably asked yourself a dozen times, “Why does my cat ____?” They can certainly be mysteries to us sometimes! Some of this seemingly quirky behavior is just due to their unique personality. Other behaviors are often universal to all cats though. If you’re looking for some answers to better understand your kitty, we’ve found an amazing resource for all things feline related! PawsomeKitty.com has just about everything you could need to know about cat care and behavior. We highly suggest you check them out! In the interim though, here are some top behaviors explained!

Why does my cat ____?

  • …suddenly become playfully aggressive? Does your cat ever latch unto your arm or leg while biting with it’s ears back and a crazy look in it’s eyes after a play session? This is a sign your kitty is over-stimulated. Some cats get overstimulated quickly. Recognize when playful nibbles and paw batting starts to escalate and then give your kitty some time to calm down.
  • …my cat scent me? Does your kitty like to rub their paws on you, or their chins? These are all signs that your cat is scenting you with the scent glands located in these regions. When your cat does this, they are often marking their territory. It may sound domineering (and maybe it is…) but they do this often because you are their “chosen human”. This means they can more easily seek you out from other humans for food or snuggles.
  • …meow loudly at night? We all love our kitty’s voice, but not when we’re trying to get some much needed shut eye. Humans and cats make great companions, but they naturally keep different hours. While cats my lay around most of the day, they frequently will become more active at night when you are trying to sleep. Meowing can often mean there is a need you have failed to meet. Since your feline will be more active at night, try to make sure they have food, water, and a clean kitty box to help minimize demands!

Photo by Vinicius de Moraes on Unsplash

Travel Safety With Your Pet – Top Tips!

With March comes Spring and after Spring comes summer! All this good news means you and your pets will be out and about shaking off some cabin fever. Travel safety is second nature for you. You always buckle your seat belt and check your mirrors. If you’re traveling with your pet it’s important you check for their travel safety too!A small, low speed collision can still send your light-weight pet from the front to the rear of your vehicle (or vice versa), causing serious injury.

Pet Travel Safety

Minimize and Secure –  Objects can become dangerous projectiles in an accident. While it may be tempting to just let stuff pile up in your vehicle, this is a safety hazard. Try to minimize what you keep in the front cargo area of your vehicle. Especially heavy or sharp objects that could be dangerous if thrown. If your vehicle has an open trunk area like most SUV’s use straps to secure luggage and other items.

Get a Car Seat or Travel Crate – Yup, they exist. Smaller pets do great in little pet care seats like this one. They are padded and attach to a body harness (be sure you use a body harness and don’t attach to their collar). This keeps them from being tossed around and increases travel safety by keeping them from becoming a distraction for the driver. Travel crates for large pets are also great, but be sure they are properly secured.

Pet Seat Belts – If you’ve got a well behaved pet, consider investing in a pet seat belt. These are secured using the same seat belt hookups already installed in your vehicle and fit around your pet like a body harness. They keep your pet secured in case of accidents or sudden braking and turns.

photo credit: Hanafan Car driver via photopin (license)

Pet Litter – The Best Types for Your Pet!

If you have a cat, rabbit, or other small critter like a hamster you purchase pet litter regularly. Maybe at the time you got your pet you didn’t look into it that much. Litter is litter, right? Well, sort of. Would you love to improve the process of cleaning up after your pet? Is your litter choice healthy? Read on while we break down the types and help you improve your pets bathroom experience!

Pet Litter – The Cat Edition

Did you know that before WWII people filled their cats litter boxes with sand, dirt, or ashes? Not the cleanest options to be honest. At the time, the military was using absorbent clay to clean up oil spills in factories and a former sailor had an idea – thus pet litter was born!

Clay litter was a big improvement over sand or dirt. It didn’t stick to the cats paws and get tracked around as much. It also helped with odor control. We’ve come a long way since the technology of WWII though! Clumping cat litter was later developed allowing pet owners to simply remove the soiled clay instead of replacing it all.

Now clay pet litters even come in scented varieties. While this may be nice for us, most pets don’t care for it. Be sure to gauge your pets reaction before you stock up on it.

Other natural pet litter options include litter made from recycled paper pellets, pine pulp, and even corn cobs! Many of these options don’t combat odor the way clay does, and will have to be changed more frequently too.

Small Animal Bedding and Litter

While clay based pet litter may be the best option for cats, it’s usually the worst choice for other critters. Many small animals like hamsters or gerbils live and sleep in the same material they use for litter. Wood chips like pine or aspen are most often used for these small creatures, though a paper option like the CareFresh bedding/litter is also a popular, though more expensive choice. These creatures will often have a designated area of their cage where they do most of their bathroom business. Regardless of litter choice, it’s important to regularly refresh this area.

Paper fiber litter is an ideal choice for a rabbits litter box, as it tracks very little and absorbs well. Aspen pellets are a great choice for absorption, though some pets enjoy fluffier material. Aspen chips or fiber over the pellets can be a great combination. Avoid pine chips for rabbit litter however. Pine, when soaked in rabbit urine can create unhealthy fumes for your pet.

Whatever litter choice works best for you and your pet, be sure that you keep their bathroom area clean. Many pets won’t use poorly kept litter boxes!

photo credit: Carly & Art Eco-Bun Henrietta knows a grand way to reuse packing material via photopin (license)

Moving + Pets – Stress, The Pet Nanny Guide For Your Move!

How to Move House With Pets Without the Stress

In 2016, 11.2 percent of the American population moved to a new home. Many of these households have at least one pet. Data gathered by the American Veterinary Medical Foundation in 2012 shows that over 80 million Americans have pets. With an approximate of 40 million households moving to a new home each year against the total US population of over 323 million, it is safe to say that many households moving house have at least one dog, cat, bird, or horse. This is why professional pet sitters are called pre-move and during the move itself.

The Moving Process

A good number of homeowners also seek to move house while re-mortgaging their old property. Buy to let mortgages to family members, such as siblings and parents is increasingly becoming popular in the US. This can be due to a son or daughter still working or going to school in the area or other family members wanting to stay in the old home for other reasons.

If you are leaving your old home for a new one, and looking into buy to let mortgages, one thing is for sure – you and your pets will be very stressed out by the move. Whatever the circumstances, moving house with your pets will prove to be challenging.

Stress on Your Dogs or Cats

Moving to a new home is one of life’s most stressful events and this is true even if you are moving from an old house to a palace or when you are moving to a new state or just down the street. There will be so many things on your plate and your pets will know something’s up. After all, they’d keep seeing strangers visiting your house.

By the time that you are already inundated with things that need to get done, your pets’ meal times will vary and they won’t get the attention that you usually give them. Apart from too many strangers visiting your home, a disruption in their schedule will contribute to the stress that they are experiencing..

How to Keep Your Pets at Ease Pre-Move

There are ways for you to reduce your pets’ stress pre-move.One of the most helpful is to stick to their feeding schedule.

For dog owners, it is imperative that you make time for play time because nothing stresses your furry friends more than suddenly being neglected or ignored. You can also take them out of the house whenever you can so that you and your dogs can get away from all that stress even for a bit.

How to Reduce Your Pets’ Stress Levels During the Move

Put their IDs on them and keep their favorite toys and other possessions such as their beds with them. Make sure that you call a pet nanny beforehand so that a professional can take care of your pets while you are busy. This is ideal because the nanny will get them away from the craziness when the movers start getting all of your household items out of the house.

When you are finally in your new home, make sure that you take care of your pets’ needs. Go right back to their routine and play with them even if you have lots of boxes to unpack. Their beds, toys, and other items must be taken out of the box so that they can be reunited with familiar items. It is also advisable to give your pets time to get comfortable in their new home before inviting people over.

Photo by Krista Mangulsone on Unsplash

Grooming An Overexcited Dog? Tips to Help – Part 1

Some dogs are laid-back and calm, while others are energetic and overly excited about everything. The problem is that no matter their character, at one time or another you will need to groom your dog and there is no doubt that handling energetic and overly excited dogs is much more challenging and overwhelming. For many dog owners, we’re sure it won’t take a lot to imagine grooming an energetic dog. In fact, it’s no doubt something you may have experienced firsthand already. If this is the case, then this post might be able to offer some help.

There are specific methods that can help you keep your dog’s grooming session as straightforward as possible, helping your pet to remain calm and relaxed throughout.

Here are this weeks top two tips for grooming overexcited and boisterous dogs:

Have a Strategy in Place

The first step towards a smooth and comfortable grooming session is having a good strategy. A grooming strategy should include keeping the session short – long sessions only exacerbate your dog’s energetic state of mind. Keep them, preferably, no longer than 10-15 minutes. Some dogs may even need short breaks to calm down.

Prevent your dog from wanting to escape. This is especially important if your dog is an escape artist! Energetic dogs think that grooming is a game and by escaping they are actively participating in it. So, unless you are in an enclosed area, chances are your dog will find a way to make a run for it.

Have a firm hold of your dog. If you have to work alone, it is best to restrain your dog by looping one arm around your dog’s midsection. It is essential to be firm enough to hold your dog, but gentle enough to avoid hurting them. Avoid using sympathetic or baby voice during the grooming. By being calm and serious you discourage excitement.

Carry out the grooming process in a calm environment. Overstimulation induces energy rushes in overly excited dogs. The calmer the situation is, the easier it will be to keep you your dog relaxed. We recommend finding a quiet corner of your home and making that your go-to grooming spot. Ideally, you should look to avoid grooming over playful pets outdoors as this only increases the number of distractions nearby.

Think outside the box

For this tip, we suggest trying to get in the mind of your dog. Now we know this is a lot easier said than done but with a bit of practice you should hopefully be able to master this trick!

For example, if your dog does not respond well to being lifted on to the grooming table, try to do the grooming on the floor. If they don’t like the slippery surface of your bathtub, cover it with soft towels, or look into purchasing a specialized dog tub. If your dog doesn’t like getting their face wet, avoid washing this area entirely and use wet dog wipes to clean their face instead.

Any of these tiny details could be the reason your dog doesn’t enjoy being groomed and decides to play up instead. By trying to get in the head of your pet and thinking about what they like and dislike you will create a grooming routine that they enjoy instead of loath!

Come back next week for two more of our top grooming tips!

Contributed by Jenny Nolan

photo credit: ginnerobot say it with me now: awwwwwwwwwwww via photopin (license)

Mental Health & Wellbeing of Pet Ownership!

The Benefits of Pets for Mental Health and Wellbeing

Our pets are often some of our best friends and very much a part of our families – in fact, 90% of owners think of their pets as family members! They offer us love and affection when we need it the most, so it’s perhaps no surprise that spending time with them can really benefit your mental health. With 1 in 4 people now experiencing mental health problems like anxiety and depression each and every year, pets can be a brilliant source of comfort and emotional support.

There are plenty of reasons why this is the case:

  • Pet owners, especially those with dogs, get on average far more exercise than those without pets. Going outside and getting exercise has been proven to elevate mental health!
  • Pets help you be more social! Whether it’s at training classes, during a trip to the vet’s or even just when walking your dog, pet-owners find they meet lots of people they already have something in common with.
  • Perhaps most importantly, pets are amazing companions and are always there when we need them. There’s nothing better than a much needed cuddle when you’re down!

If you’d like to learn more about the ways that pets can improve your mental health, take a look at this infographic created by the Animal Health Company

 

About the author Sasha Quinn is a content writer for Animal Health Company, a supplier of canine and equine health, hygiene and grooming products.

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