Tag: pet adoption

Choosing the Right Puppy For You – Pet Matchmaking!

So you’re going to adopt a puppy. Congratulations! He can grow up to be the best friend you’ve ever had. No animal is more lovable, or more loving, than the dog. He is a gentle protector and playmate for children, a superb companion for adults. He is an incomparable pet. But there are some enormous ‘ifs’ in dog ownership and choosing the right match. Let’s look at a few of them before you take the plunge.

  • Your dog will be with you for a very long time (the average dog lives to be 12 years old, and many live much longer).
  • Your dog will become an intimate part of your family household (or he will not be a good pet).
  • Your dog will require constant care, companionship, and training (or you should not own a dog).
  • Not all dogs are suited to all people or all places (and vice versa).

Choosing a pet can be a highly emotional affair. All puppies are appealing, and it’s easy to fall for the first set of liquid brown eyes and winning ways you meet. But if you act on impulse, you might regret it later. And so might your dog, if he could only talk.

The German Shepherds, St. Bernard’s and Great Danes confined to city apartments, the delicate Chihuahua who cowers under the bed to avoid well-meant manhandling by the children, the feisty little terrier whose owner thought she was getting a lap dog – these and many more mismatched pets should have their own liberation movement.

The point is that pet ownership is a genuine responsibility, and before you accept this responsibility you should give time and thought to choosing the right pet for you.

Before Choosing, Ask Yourself Some of the Following Questions:

  • Why do you want a dog? As a companion for children, a solace for loneliness, a household guard, a hunter or a status symbol?
  • Do you have room for him? If you live in an apartment you should choose a breed that does not require a great deal of exercise. If you live in the suburbs, you should choose a dog that will accept backyard confinement. If you live in the country, your choice is almost unlimited.
  • Do you have time for him? All dogs need some companionship and play, but the young puppy requires lots of attention. If you’re not willing to give it to him and to put up with a certain amount of puppy mischief, you should consider adopting an older dog.
  • Will he be an outdoor or indoor dog? Some breeds can carpet a house with dog hairs. Others, such as Poodles, Dachshunds, Bulldogs and most of the wire-haired breeds, shed very little.
  • Do you have small children? You have a wide choice because most dogs patiently endure the trauma of children. To be fair to both children and dog, however, avoid breeds that tend to be fragile, temperamental or high-strung.
  • What kind of people do you Like? Lively, animated, aggressive, or quiet, relaxed and low-keyed? Dogs have dispositions, too. Remember when choosing that you’re matchmaking, and select a dog that will suit your own temperament.

The answers to these questions will give you an approximate profile of yourself as a pet owner and make choosing easier.

Let’s say you’re a suburban family with two small boys who are long on roughhousing and short on patience. Then you probably should choose one of the sturdy working dogs, hounds or sporting breeds with even dispositions and physical stamina to take rough-and-tumble play.

If you’re looking for a burglar alarm, you can’t do much better than choosing one of the terriers. These lively, alert, aggressive dogs will take on all comers. Terriers adapt well to apartment living, and so do the delightful and decorative toy breeds.

Toy dogs make superb companions for adults, but most are too fragile to be suitable pets for young children.

Mongrel or Purebred:

There is a right dog for you, and probably many right choices among the approximately 120 breeds currently recognized by the American Kennel Club. And there are, of course, the mixed breeds – the mutts or mongrels that for many years have been America’s favorites. They seem to be on the decline now, perhaps for good reason.

Mongrels can make superb pets, as their loyal owners will testify. But many mongrels grow up to be unattractive, unhealthy and unreliable indisposition. These are the dogs that end up in city pounds and animal shelters by the millions. Unwanted and unloved, most of them must be destroyed.

A mongrel may be a risky choice unless you know something about his ancestry. This is not difficult to trace with a crossbreed (a puppy whose dame and sire were different purebreds), but the true mutt bears a motley mixture of genes.

Of course, you may be lucky and get the smartest and most lovable dog in the world. But you do have a better chance of getting a pet of predictable size, appearance and temperament by buying a purebred animal.

The Bluebloods:

Purebred dogs are listed by the American Kennel Club under six general groups-sporting dogs, working dogs, hounds, terriers, toys and nonsporting or companion dogs. While there are exceptions in every category, the animals in each of the six groups do share certain general personality traits to help you make your selection.

Visit dog shows and breeding kennels in your area. And as you narrow your choice down, do some further reading on the breeds you are considering. You’ll find ample material at your local library. A little homework on the fascinating subject of dogs can be a lot of fun and very rewarding in making the right choice.

For further information on purebreds, write to the American Kennel Club, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. l0010. This organization, which exists to promote fine breed standards will not recommend a specific kind of dog but will put you in touch with reliable breeders in your area.

There are many fine purebred dogs not recognized by the AKC. Some of the great hunting hounds, such as the Bluetick, Redbone and Plott hounds, are listed under a separate registry. England’s Cavalier King Charles – Spaniel, a court favorite as long as, 300 years ago, is not on the AKC list. Nor is Scotland’s famous herding dog, the Border Collie.

These and many others (authorities estimate that there are as many as 400 separate breeds throughout the world) are fine blooded animals that have long been recognized in their homelands and are gradually gaining popularity in America. Two of the most recent breeds to be recognized is the Tibetan Terrier and the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier.

Male or Female?

Generalities about the personalities of the male vs. female are tricky and always subject to exceptions. As a rule, the female is little more tractable, easier to handle and train, and more of a homebody than the male.

Unless you’re going into the business of raising dogs, however, the female should be spayed, an operation that should be performed at between 7 to 10 months of age.

Spaying, incidentally, will not greatly alter your pet’s personality or necessarily lead to obesity, all legends to the contrary. It is part of the dog owner’s obligation in these days when the pet population explosion has become a matter of national concern.

If you choose a female, do not have her bred unless you can guarantee homes for all her puppies.

The male dog is usually more aggressive than the female, more inclined to roam, and tends to make strong one-man attachments. Both make fine pets. Because male dogs are more in demand, they usually cost a little more than females.

How Old?

Authorities disagree on the ideal age for adopting a puppy, though they all do agree that the puppy should not be younger than 6 weeks old. Two months is probably about right for puppy’s own health and personality development; he’s ready by then to leave the litter and join the world of people.

If you are investing in a very expensive animal, it might be wise to wait until 4 to 6 months, when he will have received his inoculations and survived the ailments that can attack the very young. But then, no doubt about it, you will have missed a lot of the fun (and hard work) of puppy’s first year of life.

Where to Buy:

Don’t buy, adopt if you can! Shelters are full of beautiful loving dogs that need homes first. Always check your local shelters for a good family match before you look elsewhere.

If you are going to buy, by far the most reliable source is an established breeder or kennel recommended by the AKC or your veterinarian.

You can get good dogs from private owners, too, but be sure to investigate both sides of the dog’s family tree. The pet shop adds one extra step for a puppy, sometimes a traumatic one, between the comfort of his litter and the adventure of his new home. It is much better to choose a puppy directly from his own litter. This is not always possible for city dwellers, however. If you buy from a pet shop, make very sure it is a clean, reliable, long-established operation; and take special pains to check out your prospective pet’s health and disposition. You can never be too careful when choosing your companion.

This is no time for bargain-hunting. A puppy is one purchase that. you won’t turn in for next year’s model, and your initial investment can assure you of a healthy specimen.

Wherever you get your dog, he should be examined by a veterinarian before final purchase.

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AUTHOR BIO: Imad LB is the founder of a dog blog called Howpup.com. 37-year-old, entrepreneur, dog lover and passionate blogger. He loves to write about dog training, health issues, dog tips, and advice.

= = = = = Image source: https://pixabay.com/en/puppies-golden-doggies-688425/

Shelter Animal Adoption Tips

Pet adoption is a cause near and dear to our hearts here at Pet Nanny. We like to see every critter in a warm loving home! Anything we can do to ease the adoption process and get a shelter animal in your home, we want to do!

Cindy Grant at NoLongerWild.com has compiled the ultimate treasure trove of shelter animal adoption tips! The labor of love is really impressive! Here are some of the highlights of her work, but ultimately, we suggest you head over to her site too for the full details if you have any questions or concerns!

Shelters

Did you know there are different types of animal shelters? Each different type has its own operating procedures. You may find it helpful to know what kind your local shelter is so you know what to expect before you go there! Here are the five types Cindy identifies:

  • Municipal Animal Shelters
  • Private Full Service Non-Profit Animal Shelters
  • Non-Profit Full Service With Animal Control
  • Non-Profit With Limited Space Animal Rescue Shelters
  • Animal Rescue Groups

Need help identifying good shelters from bad ones? She helps with this too! Aside from taking note of the general well-being of the animals and their living conditions she also addresses a couple important, yet not often mentioned aspects:

  • Is the staff friendly? That’s a great sign that they are happy to help a future pet parent! However, don’t be quick to get offended as they may grill you over certain aspects of your life. They’re not there to be your friend, they’re there to ensure each pet goes to a loving and capable home so they don’t see them back at the shelter!
  • Shelter pets aren’t “free”! While shelters shouldn’t demand a “donation” with adoption, they will charge you an adoption fee. This isn’t for-profit though, so don’t get the wrong idea. This fee frequently covers the cost of spaying/neutering, shots, and other preventative care your pet received under their care. It’s important that you get an itemized list of these things so you know what your pet has had, and what it still needs before you head home!

Know What Questions To Ask About Your Shelter Animal!

Shelter pets have a history and you should find out as much as you can before you adopt. Does it have any preexisting health conditions? Why is it in the shelter to begin with? What’s it’s general temperament? Important questions you need to ask! Make yourself a list – but be prepared to answer some yourself!

 

 

photo credit: M.P.N.texan Helen via photopin (license)

Adopting a Dog – EVERYTHING You Need To Know

There are a lot of misconceptions about adopting a dog these days… People hear of overloaded shelters and think that the volunteers will be happy to see them coming. They are happy to see you coming, but that doesn’t mean that you just walk in, grab your choice of pet and walk out. It’s important to the volunteers that pets that leave shelters are going to forever homes. They don’t want to see the same pet returned because the owner wasn’t prepared for the experience. So here are some things you need to know before you take that big step!

The Cost

Dogs cost more than a bag of food every so often. Make sure you are financially prepared for long-term pet ownership. Here are some cost you need to consider:

  • Adoption Fee
  • Vaccinations
  • Flea/Tick/Heartworm prevention
  • Grooming
  • Pet Sitting or Kennel Costs if your away
  • Food/Toys/Bed/Leash/Collar
  • Emergency Care

…before you go adopting

  • Is your lifestyle fit for a pet? Are you away most of the day? Travel a lot?
  • Is your home suited for a dog? if so, what size? If you rent, are pets allowed?
  • Are you prepared for dealing with potential barking, chewing, or bathroom accidents? Are you dedicated enough to train them, or have them trained?
  • Are you committed for the long-term?

The Adoption Process

If you’ve decided that you’re ready for that new dog you need to be familiar with the process of adopting. There is an adoption fee. Many people think if they’re going to a shelter instead of a breeder or pet shot the pet will be free. Not so. There is an adoption fee. This fee often helps the shelter cover spaying/neutering and care costs. Fee’s vary, so ask your shelter if your are concerned. Adoption paperwork will be required too and you should be prepared to answer some questions. Many shelters will inquire about these things:

  • Your income level
  • Your living situation (rent vs own, apartment, ect)
  • Your available free time daily for your pet
  • If you have a vet
  • Who will care for the pet when you travel

These questions are asked to ensure that you have thought about these things and aren’t making an impulse buy. They also give the shelter managers the ability to assess whether or not the dog is going to a good home. Shelters don’t want to just place dogs. They want to make sure these dogs are getting the homes they deserve.

This amazing infographic is your quick reference guide to pet adoption. Print it out and go over it with your family! For more information, check out this site: http://www.gapnsw.com.au/2016/09/09/ultimate-guide-dog-adoption/

photo credit: pit Bull x Siberian Husky via photopin (license)

Adopt A Cat Month Is Here!

Adopt A Cat Checklist!

June is national Adopt-A-Cat-Month! Been thinking about getting a kitty (or a new kitty) for some time? June is the month to act! Shelters are frequently packed with kittens from unexpected Spring litters in June looking for a forever home – and that home could be yours! Not sure about it though? Don’t want to make a commitment you may not be ready for? Check out our list of things you should do or prepare for BEFORE you adopt.

Make sure your house is “cat-friendly”

  • Do you already own pets? If so, do you think they will respond favorable or hostile toward a new addition?
  • If you rent, make sure that pets are allowed and pay any required deposits!
  • Make sure you’re in the habit of keeping potential hazards out of a cats reach; medication, cosmetics, household cleaners, etc.
  • Cats are climbers and jumpers! Don’t keep fragile items of value where they could be knocked over.
  • Make sure your plants aren’t poisonous and take necessary steps to keep a new kitty from making it their litter box

Have the necessary accessories

  • Litter box with litter, scoop, and a mat or cover if needed
  • Food and water dishes with age appropriate food
  • Toys! If you don’t want all your household items to become toys, make sure you supply some!
  • Scratch posts – save your furniture and invest now!
  • Ensure there is a “Kitty Space”

Designate an area in your home for your new kitty

This can be a laundry or utility area or any place where there is easy clean up and you can preferably close off to some degree. Yes, your kitty will get to roam the house, but this will allow them to get accustomed to a going to a specific area to get their needs met; bathroom, food, scratching, and such. It also allows for a safe space that a new pet can feel safe in while they adjust!

Choose a vet and budget accordingly

Finding a vet now will help you keep your kitty healthy for the long term. Costs will vary depending on the age of cat you choose to adopt. Kittens will likely need wormers, and shots. If your shelter has kittens under 12 weeks, you will need to get them spayed or neutered yourself. And don’t forget about flea and tick control if you’re going to have an indoor/outdoor cat.

Consider a finding a good pet sitter too! You will inevitably have time when you won’t be able to be there for your kitty as much as you’d like to. A pet sitter will make sure your pet is fed, the litter box is clean, and that they get some good play time in! Most importantly adopt a kitty whose personality fits you! Spend some time with each one you’re considering and choose the best fit for your lifestyle!

photo credit: Take me home via photopin (license)

April Is National Pet Month – Celebrate With Us!

April is National Pet Month! You may be asking yourself, “What does that mean exactly?” Well it’s not just a month for pet pampering, but also for raising awareness about pet related issues! April is the month to be reminded of all the amazing ways pets impact our lives and how we can make theirs better. Below are some ways you can participate in the National Pet Month. Do you have your own April ritual to celebrate pets? Share it with us!

April Pet Awareness!

  • Support pet adoptions – Do your best to raise awareness for pet adoptions and provide loving homes to many abandoned and abused animals looking for a “forever home”. Can’t adopt one yourself? Many shelters struggle to make ends meet under growing population of homeless animals. April donations of food, treats, toys, and medicine can mean a lot toward ensuring that these pets get the best care when they are in the worst sit
  • Volunteer! – April 12-18 is also National Volunteer Week. Ask your local pet shelter if they could use some extra help with Spring cleaning or other duties! Sometimes the regular staff could use a little extra help or some much deserved time off.
  • Support pet responsibility – Help prevent overpopulated shelters by being an advocate for spay and neuter! Go one step further by raising awareness about the cost and responsibility associated with pet ownership. Informed people are less likely to get in over their heads with a pet and more likely to understand their pets unique needs!
  • Pay tribute to service animals – There are many charities out there that pay tribute to service animals; animals that were injured in the line of duty, or have reached the age of retirement. Consider donating or volunteering at one of these facilities. Service dogs range from those that help the blind to dogs that accompany firemen or police officers. Their dedication to humanity is something that deserves recognition all year long, not just April!
  • Promote the benefits of pet ownership – pet ownership has many medical and social advantages, even for those who don’t require service dogs! From lowering blood-preassure to helping build responsibility and self-esteem in children, pet ownership has tons of benefits.
  • Pamper your pet! – When you’re overworked it can be easy to get frustrated with the responsibilities associated with taking care of pets. Take this month to reflect on what a positive impact your pet has on your life. Remember not to take them for granted! Give them extra treats, make time to hit the dog park or schedule play dates! If you’re too busy, consider getting a Pet Nanny to spend some extra time with your pet! Remember, you’re their whole world!

Has a pet made an impact on your life? Share it with us on our Facebook page! We’d love to hear your story!

Instagram Photo — Follow us @canoozlepets via photopin (license)

Join actor Josh Duhamel and PetSmart with Rescue Waggin’ Tales

Josh Duhamel and PetSmart have teamed up to promote the joys of adopting a pet from a local shelter with rescue tales of adopted pets. This is a new series, aptly titled Rescue Waggin’ Tales, focusing on homeless pets traveling to their “fur”ever home. Josh’s production company, Dakotakid Media, helped produce and release it. The series is 8 episodes, and features celebrities such as Kristen Bell, Adam Shankman, and Bret Michaels, among others.

This new series looks to be heartwarming with a great ending for these great pets!

Source: http://www.petsmartcharities.org/campaigns/rescue-waggin

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