Tag: Dogs

Heroic Cats – Small in Stature, Big in Deed

Dogs are well known for their heroic behavior. Their valor is sung by everyday pet owners all the way to those on the battlefield! Cats on the other hand have an established reputation for being self-consumed and having little genuine interest in anything beyond getting fed and petted. It turns out though that while cats may not have the strength to drag someone to safety, they do some pretty heroic things too! Cats are very attune to medical emergencies and on multiple occasions have alerted their owners to internal threats that they themselves didn’t know where occurring! Take a look at our list of five kitties due some recognition!

Heroic Cats to the Rescue!

  • Schnautize and the Gas Leak – A Montana couple fast asleep, were awakened by Schnautzie’s persistent paw tapping on their sleeping faces. Once awake they became aware of the sound of gas hissing! Upon evacuating the home and calling the fire department they were told their basement had been filling with gas from a leak while they slept! One spark from their furnace igniting would have sent the house to pieces!
  • Pudding and the Diabetic – Pudding was a shelter kitty who hadn’t even been in her new home for 24 hours when the woman who adopted her began to fall into a diabetic coma while asleep. Pudding, sensing something was wrong, tried to keep her new owner awake. When that failed she ran to the woman’s son’s room, waking and alerting him to action.
  • Leo and the Burglar – A robber breaking into a home one night encountered a cat named Leo. Leo was so upset by the burglars presence he began yowling and making such a racket that the surprised crook abandoned his pursuit.
  • Baby and the Fire – A grey tabby named Baby sprung into action when a fire broke out in his owners apartment and their fire alarm failed to notify them. Baby awoke the couple in time to get to safety, saving the couple and their unborn baby!
  • Masha and the Baby in the Box – An infant who had been left on a street in a box in Russia owes his life to a passing cat named Masha. Masha hopped in the box with the baby and laid on top of him to keep him from freezing. Not only did she keep him warm, she yowled at passerby’s to attract attention until the baby was discovered and taken into care.

Cats might be small in stature but their gestures and efforts are certainly heroic. Do you have a story about you cat alerting you to danger? Share it with us!

Choosing the Right Puppy For You – Pet Matchmaking!

So you’re going to adopt a puppy. Congratulations! He can grow up to be the best friend you’ve ever had. No animal is more lovable, or more loving, than the dog. He is a gentle protector and playmate for children, a superb companion for adults. He is an incomparable pet. But there are some enormous ‘ifs’ in dog ownership and choosing the right match. Let’s look at a few of them before you take the plunge.

  • Your dog will be with you for a very long time (the average dog lives to be 12 years old, and many live much longer).
  • Your dog will become an intimate part of your family household (or he will not be a good pet).
  • Your dog will require constant care, companionship, and training (or you should not own a dog).
  • Not all dogs are suited to all people or all places (and vice versa).

Choosing a pet can be a highly emotional affair. All puppies are appealing, and it’s easy to fall for the first set of liquid brown eyes and winning ways you meet. But if you act on impulse, you might regret it later. And so might your dog, if he could only talk.

The German Shepherds, St. Bernard’s and Great Danes confined to city apartments, the delicate Chihuahua who cowers under the bed to avoid well-meant manhandling by the children, the feisty little terrier whose owner thought she was getting a lap dog – these and many more mismatched pets should have their own liberation movement.

The point is that pet ownership is a genuine responsibility, and before you accept this responsibility you should give time and thought to choosing the right pet for you.

Before Choosing, Ask Yourself Some of the Following Questions:

  • Why do you want a dog? As a companion for children, a solace for loneliness, a household guard, a hunter or a status symbol?
  • Do you have room for him? If you live in an apartment you should choose a breed that does not require a great deal of exercise. If you live in the suburbs, you should choose a dog that will accept backyard confinement. If you live in the country, your choice is almost unlimited.
  • Do you have time for him? All dogs need some companionship and play, but the young puppy requires lots of attention. If you’re not willing to give it to him and to put up with a certain amount of puppy mischief, you should consider adopting an older dog.
  • Will he be an outdoor or indoor dog? Some breeds can carpet a house with dog hairs. Others, such as Poodles, Dachshunds, Bulldogs and most of the wire-haired breeds, shed very little.
  • Do you have small children? You have a wide choice because most dogs patiently endure the trauma of children. To be fair to both children and dog, however, avoid breeds that tend to be fragile, temperamental or high-strung.
  • What kind of people do you Like? Lively, animated, aggressive, or quiet, relaxed and low-keyed? Dogs have dispositions, too. Remember when choosing that you’re matchmaking, and select a dog that will suit your own temperament.

The answers to these questions will give you an approximate profile of yourself as a pet owner and make choosing easier.

Let’s say you’re a suburban family with two small boys who are long on roughhousing and short on patience. Then you probably should choose one of the sturdy working dogs, hounds or sporting breeds with even dispositions and physical stamina to take rough-and-tumble play.

If you’re looking for a burglar alarm, you can’t do much better than choosing one of the terriers. These lively, alert, aggressive dogs will take on all comers. Terriers adapt well to apartment living, and so do the delightful and decorative toy breeds.

Toy dogs make superb companions for adults, but most are too fragile to be suitable pets for young children.

Mongrel or Purebred:

There is a right dog for you, and probably many right choices among the approximately 120 breeds currently recognized by the American Kennel Club. And there are, of course, the mixed breeds – the mutts or mongrels that for many years have been America’s favorites. They seem to be on the decline now, perhaps for good reason.

Mongrels can make superb pets, as their loyal owners will testify. But many mongrels grow up to be unattractive, unhealthy and unreliable indisposition. These are the dogs that end up in city pounds and animal shelters by the millions. Unwanted and unloved, most of them must be destroyed.

A mongrel may be a risky choice unless you know something about his ancestry. This is not difficult to trace with a crossbreed (a puppy whose dame and sire were different purebreds), but the true mutt bears a motley mixture of genes.

Of course, you may be lucky and get the smartest and most lovable dog in the world. But you do have a better chance of getting a pet of predictable size, appearance and temperament by buying a purebred animal.

The Bluebloods:

Purebred dogs are listed by the American Kennel Club under six general groups-sporting dogs, working dogs, hounds, terriers, toys and nonsporting or companion dogs. While there are exceptions in every category, the animals in each of the six groups do share certain general personality traits to help you make your selection.

Visit dog shows and breeding kennels in your area. And as you narrow your choice down, do some further reading on the breeds you are considering. You’ll find ample material at your local library. A little homework on the fascinating subject of dogs can be a lot of fun and very rewarding in making the right choice.

For further information on purebreds, write to the American Kennel Club, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. l0010. This organization, which exists to promote fine breed standards will not recommend a specific kind of dog but will put you in touch with reliable breeders in your area.

There are many fine purebred dogs not recognized by the AKC. Some of the great hunting hounds, such as the Bluetick, Redbone and Plott hounds, are listed under a separate registry. England’s Cavalier King Charles – Spaniel, a court favorite as long as, 300 years ago, is not on the AKC list. Nor is Scotland’s famous herding dog, the Border Collie.

These and many others (authorities estimate that there are as many as 400 separate breeds throughout the world) are fine blooded animals that have long been recognized in their homelands and are gradually gaining popularity in America. Two of the most recent breeds to be recognized is the Tibetan Terrier and the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier.

Male or Female?

Generalities about the personalities of the male vs. female are tricky and always subject to exceptions. As a rule, the female is little more tractable, easier to handle and train, and more of a homebody than the male.

Unless you’re going into the business of raising dogs, however, the female should be spayed, an operation that should be performed at between 7 to 10 months of age.

Spaying, incidentally, will not greatly alter your pet’s personality or necessarily lead to obesity, all legends to the contrary. It is part of the dog owner’s obligation in these days when the pet population explosion has become a matter of national concern.

If you choose a female, do not have her bred unless you can guarantee homes for all her puppies.

The male dog is usually more aggressive than the female, more inclined to roam, and tends to make strong one-man attachments. Both make fine pets. Because male dogs are more in demand, they usually cost a little more than females.

How Old?

Authorities disagree on the ideal age for adopting a puppy, though they all do agree that the puppy should not be younger than 6 weeks old. Two months is probably about right for puppy’s own health and personality development; he’s ready by then to leave the litter and join the world of people.

If you are investing in a very expensive animal, it might be wise to wait until 4 to 6 months, when he will have received his inoculations and survived the ailments that can attack the very young. But then, no doubt about it, you will have missed a lot of the fun (and hard work) of puppy’s first year of life.

Where to Buy:

Don’t buy, adopt if you can! Shelters are full of beautiful loving dogs that need homes first. Always check your local shelters for a good family match before you look elsewhere.

If you are going to buy, by far the most reliable source is an established breeder or kennel recommended by the AKC or your veterinarian.

You can get good dogs from private owners, too, but be sure to investigate both sides of the dog’s family tree. The pet shop adds one extra step for a puppy, sometimes a traumatic one, between the comfort of his litter and the adventure of his new home. It is much better to choose a puppy directly from his own litter. This is not always possible for city dwellers, however. If you buy from a pet shop, make very sure it is a clean, reliable, long-established operation; and take special pains to check out your prospective pet’s health and disposition. You can never be too careful when choosing your companion.

This is no time for bargain-hunting. A puppy is one purchase that. you won’t turn in for next year’s model, and your initial investment can assure you of a healthy specimen.

Wherever you get your dog, he should be examined by a veterinarian before final purchase.

= = = = =

AUTHOR BIO: Imad LB is the founder of a dog blog called Howpup.com. 37-year-old, entrepreneur, dog lover and passionate blogger. He loves to write about dog training, health issues, dog tips, and advice.

= = = = = Image source: https://pixabay.com/en/puppies-golden-doggies-688425/

Grooming An Overexcited Dog? Tips to Help, Part 2

Overexcited Dog Grooming Tips, Continued!

Did you try out last weeks tips but felt like you needed a couple more? We’ve got you covered! Here are two more tips for helping you groom your overexcited dog!

Burn Off Excess Energy Before Grooming Your Dog

Some dogs are naturally more energetic than others. For example, Chihuahuas and Jack Russell Terriers have a go-all-day stamina and, if bored, can turn to destructive behavior. Spinning in circles, jumping up and down and excessive, unreasonable barking are all signs the are overexcited. The only way to lower your dog’s excitement is to have them spend its energy physically.

A well-exercised dog is much more easily groomed than a well-rested dog. It is a good idea to exercise your dog 1-2 hours before you want to groom them. Running with your dog can be a great way to burn off any excess energy, and we also recommend you introduce other physically and mentally demanding activities like a game of fetch or a playdate with other dogs.

Reward Your Dog for Good Behavior

The good news about overexcited dogs is that they are overly excited about food too. Use this to your advantage by offering your dog several small treats during the grooming session, and one big treat at the end of the session. This will teach your dog that if it obeys you, it will get rewarded.

If you don’t always want to reward your dog with food you can also use other positive reinforcement techniques, such as praise and play, whatever your dog enjoys doing. The aim is to help your dog associate the grooming session with a positive experience.

These strategies may not work for all dogs. Some dogs need professional training for keeping calm while being groomed and pampered. However, before seeking professional guidance, try implementing the previously described tips.

To round up:

  • Make the grooming session a routine. Let your dog get used to the idea of being frequently handled and groomed.
  • To establish this activity as routine, introduce grooming when your dog is a young and easily adaptable puppy.
  • Be calm and serious. How you feel reflects and transfers to your dog.
  • Never yell nor use physical punishment during the grooming process. This is not only abusive but counterproductive too.

We hope the tips included throughout this post will help you groom your overexcited pup more effectively.

Just remember to take things slow and be patient with your dog. In time, they will learn that grooming and play are two separate things and the whole experience will become a lot more enjoyable for both you and your pet.

Contributed by Jenny Nolan

photo credit: nickobec border collie in bath via photopin (license)

Grooming An Overexcited Dog? Tips to Help – Part 1

Some dogs are laid-back and calm, while others are energetic and overly excited about everything. The problem is that no matter their character, at one time or another you will need to groom your dog and there is no doubt that handling energetic and overly excited dogs is much more challenging and overwhelming. For many dog owners, we’re sure it won’t take a lot to imagine grooming an energetic dog. In fact, it’s no doubt something you may have experienced firsthand already. If this is the case, then this post might be able to offer some help.

There are specific methods that can help you keep your dog’s grooming session as straightforward as possible, helping your pet to remain calm and relaxed throughout.

Here are this weeks top two tips for grooming overexcited and boisterous dogs:

Have a Strategy in Place

The first step towards a smooth and comfortable grooming session is having a good strategy. A grooming strategy should include keeping the session short – long sessions only exacerbate your dog’s energetic state of mind. Keep them, preferably, no longer than 10-15 minutes. Some dogs may even need short breaks to calm down.

Prevent your dog from wanting to escape. This is especially important if your dog is an escape artist! Energetic dogs think that grooming is a game and by escaping they are actively participating in it. So, unless you are in an enclosed area, chances are your dog will find a way to make a run for it.

Have a firm hold of your dog. If you have to work alone, it is best to restrain your dog by looping one arm around your dog’s midsection. It is essential to be firm enough to hold your dog, but gentle enough to avoid hurting them. Avoid using sympathetic or baby voice during the grooming. By being calm and serious you discourage excitement.

Carry out the grooming process in a calm environment. Overstimulation induces energy rushes in overly excited dogs. The calmer the situation is, the easier it will be to keep you your dog relaxed. We recommend finding a quiet corner of your home and making that your go-to grooming spot. Ideally, you should look to avoid grooming over playful pets outdoors as this only increases the number of distractions nearby.

Think outside the box

For this tip, we suggest trying to get in the mind of your dog. Now we know this is a lot easier said than done but with a bit of practice you should hopefully be able to master this trick!

For example, if your dog does not respond well to being lifted on to the grooming table, try to do the grooming on the floor. If they don’t like the slippery surface of your bathtub, cover it with soft towels, or look into purchasing a specialized dog tub. If your dog doesn’t like getting their face wet, avoid washing this area entirely and use wet dog wipes to clean their face instead.

Any of these tiny details could be the reason your dog doesn’t enjoy being groomed and decides to play up instead. By trying to get in the head of your pet and thinking about what they like and dislike you will create a grooming routine that they enjoy instead of loath!

Come back next week for two more of our top grooming tips!

Contributed by Jenny Nolan

photo credit: ginnerobot say it with me now: awwwwwwwwwwww via photopin (license)

Mental Health & Wellbeing of Pet Ownership!

The Benefits of Pets for Mental Health and Wellbeing

Our pets are often some of our best friends and very much a part of our families – in fact, 90% of owners think of their pets as family members! They offer us love and affection when we need it the most, so it’s perhaps no surprise that spending time with them can really benefit your mental health. With 1 in 4 people now experiencing mental health problems like anxiety and depression each and every year, pets can be a brilliant source of comfort and emotional support.

There are plenty of reasons why this is the case:

  • Pet owners, especially those with dogs, get on average far more exercise than those without pets. Going outside and getting exercise has been proven to elevate mental health!
  • Pets help you be more social! Whether it’s at training classes, during a trip to the vet’s or even just when walking your dog, pet-owners find they meet lots of people they already have something in common with.
  • Perhaps most importantly, pets are amazing companions and are always there when we need them. There’s nothing better than a much needed cuddle when you’re down!

If you’d like to learn more about the ways that pets can improve your mental health, take a look at this infographic created by the Animal Health Company

 

About the author Sasha Quinn is a content writer for Animal Health Company, a supplier of canine and equine health, hygiene and grooming products.

Christmas Safety Tips For You & Your Pet!

Christmas Safety Comes First During Holidays!

Holidays are a time meant for family vacations and friends getting together. Many also plan a vacation away from home. As a pet owner, there is an extra responsibility of putting your pets in safe hands before going on a family vacation. There are several pet care services that work during these holidays so that the pet owners can enjoy a nice vacation. However, it is a busy season for them and some are booked months before the holidays begin.
Before you plan to leave for a vacation, it is recommended that you take care of a few things at your home for maximum Christmas safety. You don’t want to put your pet and Pet Nanny in trouble. It is always better to have pet-friendly decorations at home, objects that are not sharp or breakable. It is better not to encourage your pets to play with decorations. Tether the tree to a strong object to avoid a fall. Check your furnace, house pipes, doors, and windows for any leaks. Do not keep any candies or chocolates that your dog can access as it can be very harmful to your pets. These tips to keep your pet safe during Christmas will hopefully help you have a safe Christmas and a wonderful vacation from Pet Nanny &  Top Dog Tips.

 

 

 

Ensuring Quality Meat In Your Dog Food!

Finding Quality Meat that is Safe and Good for Dogs

The perfect cure for depression and one of the best stress busters are pets, and dogs are arguably the most perfect pets for people with these health problems. That is just one of the many reasons why some people adopt dogs, and how canines help people more than we help them. Considering the aforementioned, it is our responsibility to do our best in taking care of our companions, and that starts with a good diet. For a dog a good diet means quality meat!

Dogs love meat and dogs need meat. As pet parents we must ensure that it is of good quality and sourced from reputable places. There are different quality meats used in different brands of commercial dog food diets. For example, some fish have higher mercury levels than others and certain protein sources can be over or undercooked before they’re used in the formula. It’s essential for dog owners to familiarize themselves with the way meat is processed before it’s turned into dry kibble or put into a can, and other aspects of the process to ensure only good quality meats come our dogs’ way.

If you are confused what to feed your dog, you can ditch the packaged dog food and cook for them yourself. It’s the only way to exactly know what you are feeding it. Or you can check out these tips from Top Dog Tips – the perfect resource in the form of infographic on quality meat in dog food for more information and tips on feeding your dog:

Pet-Friendly Apartment – Find One Now!

Having a pet can be a great joy and blessing! …but it can also be a bit of a headache when it comes to your housing options. Finding a pet-friendly apartment can be a chore. While your pet may be a blessing to you, landlords see them as liabilities.

Padmapper.com has a great breakdown of tips for helping your get your dream apartment with your pet right alongside. For example, offer to pay renters insurance for pets. Knowing their property is protected can be a game changer with landlords. Good first impressions are also so important. Don’t show up covered in pet hair! If they want to meet your pet, ensure they are properly groomed and look well cared for (which they should be!).

Don’t underestimate the importance of finding the right pet-friendly apartment. Moving is rough on you and your pet(s). Take your time and research your options. Get to know your landlord a little too if you can. Do they seem like they might be uncomfortable with your pet? Don’t push the issue. All you’ve done is create a headache for you, your pet, and landlord if you have to move again in a few months!

Find A Pet-Friendly Apartment in Philadelphia Now!

Check out Pad Mapper and find you and your pet the apartment of your dreams!

How To Keep Clean In A Pet-Friendly Home

Ahh, a change in the weather equals a change in clothes, sports, activities, décor—and pet messes, too. Whether the weather is moving from winter to spring or fall to winter—or any time in between—you’re likely seeing an uptick in moisture, dirt, and debris as your pets, particularly your dogs, go in and out and back again. And while it’s fun to enjoy the weather with your favorite four-legged family members, it’s no fun to try to clean up after them—again and again and again. Keeping a clean pet-friendly home is a chore! Instead of doing that, though, be strategic about your home and your pets with a few simple tips and tricks.

For example, it’s time to take a hard look at your entryway: How is it set up, and how can you make it a better dirt-keeper as your pet goes in and out? Having wipes handy to take care of muddy paws is one strategy. What else works? This graphic can help.

How to keep a clean pet-friendly home!

Moving With Pets And Kids – A Step-By-Step Guide

A Step-By-Step Guide To Moving With Pets And Kids

Moving into a new home can be one of the most taxing circumstances of your life. You’re not just transferring all your belongings, you’re changing your life around. It’s no surprise that some people believe moving into a new home is more stressful than getting a divorce. As taxing as it can be, preparing pets and/or kids could make it even more taxing — as the emotional weight they carry throughout the process can be even greater.

For pets and young children, habits are very important. Children experience constant changes as they develop and grow, so the security of familiarity — such as bedrooms or backyards — provides some much-needed stability in their lives. For pets, any changes to their schedules and surroundings can be displeasing. In both cases, moving to a new house can throw their lives into upheaval. Unless you pay special attention to their needs before, during and after the move, children and pets could become withdrawn, scared or depressed.

Luckily, there are some steps you can take to make the process potentially less taxing for your pets and children. For example, you can help kids adjust to the idea of moving by letting them choose the color of their new bedrooms. With pets, you can help them adjust by taking them for long car rides (if you’re traveling a long-distance). Packing your children’s favorite toys in the same box can help them feel more comfortable by being aware of where they are, not to mention easily handy after move. Leaving pets with a sitter could help to keep them occupied. Once you arrive at the new house, you can help kids and pets settle in by arranging their belongings as similar as possible to the layout in the old house. You can also help your pets by ensuring they don’t get neglected during all the unpacking. Consider a dog walker to get them some exercise!

These and other tips for all stages of the relocation process can be found in the guide created by University Moving and Storage below.

We take pride in making your pets' well being a priority while you are away from home.

"Carol was very loving and attentive to Chance and Nina. She went out of her way to stay in touch and respond to communications while we were gone. She was cheerfully accommodating when we changed plans for our return date. We are completely satisfied with your service and will be using you again."

Read more reviews

© Copyright 2020 Pet Nanny. All Rights Reserved. | Sitemap | Privacy Policy

Pet Nanny-Pet Sitters of The Main Line, offers pet sitting, dog walking, house sitting and concierge services in Malvern, Paoli, Berwyn, Devon, Wayne, Chesterbrook, Strafford, Radnor, St.Davids, Rosemont, Bryn Mawr, Villanova, Haverford, Ardmore, Wynnewood, Gulph Mills, Conshohocken and Newtown Square.