Tag: Dogs

Growing Pains – How To Raise A Happy Pet

Growing with your pet can be an amazing experience. Kittens, puppies, baby bunnies – whatever your style watching them grow and learn is a real treat! On occasion though, two different species coming together, each trying to learn about the other so they can co-habitat in harmony, can cause a few growing pains. So what can you expect to struggle with from your new young pet? Check out our list of common growing pains!

What Traits Do You Need To Help Your Growing Pet?

Patience – No matter what kind of pet you’re raising up for a companion the key virtue you need to have is patience! Growing pets need thoughtful discipline and the only way to achieve thoughtful (as opposed to “in the moment” discipline is to understand that your pet has no way of understanding the concept of how much that shoe they just ruined cost, or what a big deal it is to stain the carpet. They have to learn that there are unacceptable behaviors, but one thing they DON’T need to learn is to fear you.

Growing kittens need patience!

Consistency – While training a growing pet it is of the highest importance that you are consistent. This applies to both disciplining them consistently for wrong behavior, rewarding good behavior, and being on a regular schedule. It can be hard to train a puppy to do their business outside when you leave for random long periods of time and know one is there to tend to them. When you get a new pet, it’s important that your life is stable so they learn your routine. If you can’t be there to attend to you growing pets needs, make sure you can higher a pet sitter or have a willing friend who can.

The Value of Distraction – While with some pets implementing a regular, consistent discipline is ideal, other pets don’t respond to that well at all. Rabbits are one of those pets that you just can’t discipline. Due to their nature as a prey animal instead of a predator (like most other pets) they are much more sensitive. They don’t perceive punishment as “discipline” but rather as “danger”, and they will learn to avoid you as a threat. With rabbits, your best method of approach is to distract them from their bad behavior. If they are nosing around where they aren’t supposed to be, lure them with a treat somewhere else! provide them with plenty of toys and areas to act out their natural instincts.

Understand your pets nature – Puppies and bunnies have an urge to chew, kitties need to scratch things. These are simple facts of having a pet. Don’t set your pet up for failure by leaving expensive shoes or electronics around for little teeth. Limit your pets roaming area, keep them under careful watch, and make sure that you have provided them with an environment free from as many bad temptations as possible. Make sure your new pet has toys and areas to act out their instincts, free from admonishment. Remember, you’re supposed to be the higher intellect.

photo credit: pet24 via photopin (license)
photo credit: You sneaky rabbit! via photopin (license)

Wildlife Pet Threats – What You Need To Know

Most pets will encounter some type of wildlife during their adventures. Whether you live in a rural area or the city, wildlife encounters happen all the time! From pigeons and rats to racoons, skunks, or squirrels! Is it okay for your pet to play with wilder cousins and distant relations? Sometimes pets and wildlife can learn to be great friends but there are several precautions and scenarios you need to be aware of!

Wildlife And Your Pet

  • The City Varmints – If you live in the inner city and rarely escape closer to nature it’s likely your pets wildlife interactions will be limited. That being the case though, they are still at risk for exposure to some pretty nasty diseases, mites, and parasites from rats, roaches, or pigeons. Not to mention the poisons often put out to control such creatures.
  • The Unseen Threat – Dogs and cats may seem impervious to a lot, but they suffer from many of the same threats as us. Waterborne illnesses and parasites in the dirt are two unseen and serious threats. Most pets are fine drinking and burying their faces up in things we would never dream of, but that doesn’t mean it’s always safe! If you’re in a national park or out traveling pay attention to signs, keep your pet in areas that appear to be well travelled, and avoid letting them drink stagnant or foul smelling water.
  • The Woodland Varmints – Whether your camping or live in the country your house place is bound to be visited by a skunk, opossum, armadillo or another similar critter at some point. Make sure your pet keeps its distance! Aside from being smelly, skunks are popular carriers of rabies. While armadillos and opossums carry leprosy and lots of other diseases! Not to mention, a confrontational or overly friendly pet is likely to get bit! Did you know that skunks will kill kittens?

Wildlife love to feast on food left out for pets!

 

  • The Predators – More of a threat for campers or rural dwellers, predatory wildlife can be a big danger for pets. Coyotes, bears, mountain lions, alligators, and bobcats are all critters found across America. Don’t let your pets roam out of sight, and make sure you have an action plan should you confront one. Some suburban pets can come under attack too. Rabbit owners should always be on the look out for birds of prey!

When out hiking, always keep an eye out for wildlife warnings!

No matter where you and your pet live or choose to travel always make sure they are up to date on all their shots and preventative medicines for fleas, worms, and everything else to minimize the impact wildlife could have on them!

photo credit: Skunks Stealing Sam’s Food via photopin (license)

 

 

Car Safety Tips for Pets‏ – Keep Summer Fun & Safe!

Car rides for pets can be either an exhilarating or terrifying event. Either way, at some point or another it’s an inevitable occurrence of your pets life. Dogs are more often car companions, but cats, ferrets, or other critters take rides too! It’s easy to understand why a loving pet owner would want to take their pet with them where ever they go. Sometimes our desire to do so overrides safety for us, others, and our pets… Before you plan your next vacation, road trip, or a simple drive for errands make sure that you’re following these car safety tips for pet travel.

Car Safety Tips

  • State laws – Before you plan on taking your pet anywhere be sure that you are fully aware of all your states laws regarding pets riding in cars. Some states have very strict rules. If you’re planning a vacation that takes you into or through other states, be sure you know their laws too. Getting a ticket on vacation is no fun!
  • Plan your trip – Whether you’re traveling far or just headed to town to run errands with a pet in tow, make sure that you’ve put some thought into your trip. Map out your long distance trips by identifying rest areas or pet-friendly parks where you can stop and let your critter take care of business, stretch their legs, and get a drink. Even if your just heading to town for errands make sure you’ve got a water dish and some bottled water with you and know where you can take your pet out for a bathroom break just in case your trip takes longer than you anticipate.

Safer Car Rides With Your Pet

  • Hot Cars – Every year pets perish due to being left in hot cars. A car parked in the sun in summer can reach deadly temperatures in less time than it takes you to fill up a tank of gas. Cracked windows are great on cooler days in spring, fall, or winter, but are rarely enough in the heat of summer. If your pet can’t come in with you, it’s best to leave them at home during the peak of summer. In some states, it’s illegal to leave an animal locked in a car. Despite all the warnings though, many pet parents ignore the dangers here. If you have any doubts, we encourage you to try sitting in the car yourself in summer and see how long you can take it!
  • Windows – When your pet is in the car, you must be diligent and constantly aware of the windows. Most dogs love to reenact the iconic image with their heads out the window in the breeze! Be sure you’re aware of the dangers though! Heads outside the window can cause serious injuries due to road signs, mailboxes, and other roadside items. Be careful of windows being too low too. We’ve seen pets jump out of moving vehicles before to chase things!

Fun, but not very safe!

  • Distractions – Make sure that driving with your pet in the car doesn’t prove to be too much of a distraction. Never let your pet occupy the space immediately around you like gear shifts, the steering wheel, or gas and brake pedals. Make sure your pet isn’t big enough or positioned to obstruct your view while driving. Before taking your pet out regularly or on long trips, make sure you’ve put the effort in to “car train” your pet so they know how to behave. Car training your pet is also super handy when you have to hire a pet nanny! The better behaved your pet is, the more fun they can have in other people’s care – like trips to the park!
  • Movement injuries – Most pets in vehicles are not physically secure. This means your pet could suffer injuries should you have to come to an unexpected quick stop or swerve abruptly. There is a wide variety of pet partitions or car attachments that make traveling with your pet safer for both you and them. Shop around and see what you can find to fit your particular pet and car type!

Remember, keep summer fun by staying safe!

photo credit: I’m not thinking anything – I’m a cat via photopin (license)
photo credit: IMG_5123 via photopin (license)

 

Snakes, Spiders, & Bees – Summer Dangers For Your Pet‏

Pets see the world from a whole different perspective than us humans do. Whether you’ve got a dog, cat, ferret, rabbit or other fuzzy friend, they are all prone to sticking their snouts in places we’d never dare to shove our hand! Due to their curious, exploratory natures most pets are in danger during the summer months from snakes, spiders, and bees. Depending on your pet and with which critter the encounter was with, some could be very serious!

Pets are often overly curious of snakes!

Snakes

While there is no database for keeping records on how many pets get bit by snakes each year, most pet owners have heard of at least one pet that has suffered a bite. Like humans, with proper care bites of snakes often aren’t lethal. It is important to remember that they can be and to take all the necessary precautions if you suspect your pet has been bitten. The most lethal snakes for most pets include the Copperhead, Cotton Mouth, Rattlesnakes, and Eastern Coral Snakes. Try to be mindful of your pets wanderings and keep them where you can see them and the area they are in clearly. Cotton Mouths like to be around water while the Copperheads and Rattlesnakes like leaf litter and rocks. If your pet gets bit do your best to stay calm and identify the snake from a safe distance. If you can tie something above the wound to help slow the spread of the venom, do so. Not too tight though. Get your pet to the vet as soon as possible! Always be on the lookout for swelling and changes in behavior in case your pet is a bit when you’re not around.

Spiders

Spider bites are tricky business when it comes to pets since they are much harder to detect and there is almost no way for a vet to confirm that is what your pet is suffering from. Fortunately, unlike with snakes, it’s a bit harder for a spider to get its fangs through most animal fur coats. Usually when the spider bites do occur, they are on the nose or other area where there is little to no fur. The most dangerous spiders in America for pets are the same for humans – Brown Recluses and Black Widows. Spider bites in pets often appear as a swollen area that your pet will frequently lick. Other symptoms vary based on the spider variety, but be very concerned if a lesion developed (brown recluse) or your pet starts having difficulty coordinating and begins breathing heavily (black widow). Emergency vet care is needed in both cases to treat the symptoms, preventing them from becoming life threatening

Bees

Snakes and spiders may be more obvious threats than bees. They should not be discounted though, as a bee sting can be very serious in some pets, especially smaller ones. Also, unlike snakes and spiders, bees can be prone to attack very large numbers stinging their victims multiple times. Most pets are usually stung on the nose or the paws. In case of a basic bee sting be sure to inspect the area and make sure the bee did not leave a stinger in the wound that is still distributing venom. You can then help reduce swelling by using a cold compress. Your pet may not need emergency care, but be sure to monitor them. If the swelling becomes excessive or your pet starts having difficulty breathing, get them to the vet. Otherwise, you may just call your vet, explain the situation and they can recommend a dosage size of Benadryl based on your pet type and size. If your pet is swarmed, get them to the vet as soon as possible as multiple stings can be life threatening in most animals. Be especially wary of ground hornets who build their nests on the same level as your pets!

Make sure you know how to identify the dangerous species of snakes and spiders where you live and that you know how to detect bites and care for them. Not knowing what to do in an emergency situation could cost your pet it’s life.

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photo credit: they found a really big spider via photopin (license)

 

Water Fun & Safety With Your Pet

Memorial Day is fast approaching and for many Americans that means time spent near the water either at the lake, canoeing the river or another family friendly activity. As summer nears weekends of swimming, fishing, and boating become more regular for many. That also means more dogs are being taken along for family fun. Are you and your pet prepared? New environments mean new rules for pets and you shouldn’t rush out with a dog in tow to hit the beach without being prepared! Here are some important things to consider!

  • Does your dog even like the water? –  Pets, like people, all have individual personalities and some may not care for the water. Make sure you know how your dog feels before you drag him for a day at the lake!
  • Do they know how to swim? – While dogs may have a style of swimming named after their technique, not all pets are strong swimmers. If you have any doubts and plan to take your pet out on a boat or canoe, look into a life jacket for your pet!

Taking your dog to the water!

  • Be considerate of others – Keep your dog on a leash until you are in a relatively remote area and know that your pet obeys your commands when given. Some dogs have a natural instinct to save “drowning” people and may mistake a playful swimmer for a human in distress. Other pets may just be overly friendly. Not everyone is a fan of dogs and may not like being approached. As in any public setting, keep your pets interactions limited to you and your family.
  • Be mindful of doggie “business” – Keep the shore and water free of dog droppings.
  • Be VERY careful taking dogs out in motorized or speed boats! – Make sure they are properly kept on a short leash while in a boat, not capable of jumping over the side. If your pet is scared of loud noises then a motor boat may not be for them.
  • Be prepared for an emergency – Know what to do if your dog gets in over his head. These tips will help guide you through what to do in the event of a drowning. Knowing basic pet first aid could mean everything! To prevent an emergency, try to keep your dog close and always in an area where you can get to it quickly if needed. Stay clear of areas where boats and jet skis are in use too!
  • Be prepared for the ride home! – If you take your dog out much, your probably already know this. Just in case though, be sure you are prepared to be returning home with a wet pet and you have proper seat covers to protect your vehicle! Pack a towel for your dog and do your best to towel them off before hand!

Can’t take your pet with you for a day on the water? Make sure to have a pet sitter or friend check in on them throughout the day to ensure their needs are met and they aren’t too lonely!

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Adopt A Shelter Pet – What Steps Do You Need To Take?

If you and your family are looking to adopt a new pet for your home, you’re likely going to start at your local pet shelter. Some people can be a bit surprised when they get to the shelter and find out that pet adoption has more steps than just choosing the pet that’s right for you and taking it home. Before you head to the shelter, be sure you know what you need to do and have before you adopt!

How to adopt a shelter pet

  • Talk to the people at the shelter – The people at the shelter are the ones who have spent the most time with each individual animal and know their personalities. Before you adopt talk with the people who take care of the animals about your family and lifestyle. Do you like to do outdoors activities or are you, more homebodies? Do you have small children or other pets in the house? These people can help guide you to the pets best suited to your family’s lifestyle making the bonding process a breeze for both your family and the new pet!
  • Don’t rush! – Just because you’ve decided to get a pet doesn’t mean that you have to leave with one on your first trip to a shelter. Spend time with the pets you are considering and get to know them. Some shelters will let you take dogs on a walk and spend some one-on-one or family time with the pet you are considering.
  • Bring your paperwork – Shelters like to make sure that when someone comes to adopt a pet they are doing so with the best intentions for the animal and are prepared for the commitment. Make sure to have a photo ID with you and your current address. If you’re a renter, some shelters may require that you have a copy of your lease agreement or written permission from your landlord that you are allowed to have pets. These precautions help ensure that the pet is moving into a lasting and stable environment instead of an impulse adoption that will end up on their doorstep in a week or two again.
  • Bring Money – Shelters are not a free place to adopt a pet. They have to cover the expenses associated with operating, and some shelters will spay/neuter, and vaccinate the pets when they first come in. Be sure that you are prepared for the expense required bringing your pet home.
  • Ask for your new pets medical history – While some shelters will spay/neuter or vaccinate pets, not all do. Make sure you know what medical treatment your pet has had, and what services it may need. It’s often best to plan on a vet check-up shortly after you adopt regardless of your pets known history.

Why should you adopt a pet instead of buying a new one from a breeder or pet shop? Pet shelters are often overwhelmed with abandoned pets missing their homes and a loving family. Breeders breed pets to meet demand while shelters try to find homes for already existing pets in need of love.

 

Adopt A Shelter Pet – What Steps Do You Need To Take?

If you and your family are looking to adopt a new pet for your home, you’re likely going to start at your local pet shelter. Some people can be a bit surprised when they get to the shelter and find out that pet adoption has more steps than just choosing the pet that’s right for you and taking it home. Before you head to the shelter, be sure you know what you need to do and have before you adopt!

How to adopt a shelter pet

  • Talk to the people at the shelter – The people at the shelter are the ones who have spent the most time with each individual animal and know their personalities. Before you adopt talk with the people who take care of the animals about your family and lifestyle. Do you like to do outdoors activities or are you, more homebodies? Do you have small children or other pets in the house? These people can help guide you to the pets best suited to your family’s lifestyle making the bonding process a breeze for both your family and the new pet!
  • Don’t rush! – Just because you’ve decided to get a pet doesn’t mean that you have to leave with one on your first trip to a shelter. Spend time with the pets you are considering and get to know them. Some shelters will let you take dogs on a walk and spend some one-on-one or family time with the pet you are considering.
  • Bring your paperwork – Shelters like to make sure that when someone comes to adopt a pet they are doing so with the best intentions for the animal and are prepared for the commitment. Make sure to have a photo ID with you and your current address. If you’re a renter, some shelters may require that you have a copy of your lease agreement or written permission from your landlord that you are allowed to have pets. These precautions help ensure that the pet is moving into a lasting and stable environment instead of an impulse adoption that will end up on their doorstep in a week or two again.
  • Bring Money – Shelters are not a free place to adopt a pet. They have to cover the expenses associated with operating, and some shelters will spay/neuter, and vaccinate the pets when they first come in. Be sure that you are prepared for the expense required bringing your pet home.
  • Ask for your new pets medical history – While some shelters will spay/neuter or vaccinate pets, not all do. Make sure you know what medical treatment your pet has had, and what services it may need. It’s often best to plan on a vet check-up shortly after you adopt regardless of your pets known history.

Why should you adopt a pet instead of buying a new one from a breeder or pet shop? Pet shelters are often overwhelmed with abandoned pets missing their homes and a loving family. Breeders breed pets to meet demand while shelters try to find homes for already existing pets in need of love.

 

Superstitions and Your Pet

Animals have played a big role throughout human civilization, so it’s no wonder we have so many superstitions surrounding pets! While a lot of superstitions may seem crazy, there are actually practical reasons for others. Check out our list below to find out what sort of old-world beliefs may have affected your pets life!

Pet Superstitions

  • The Black Cat – A black cat is probably one of the more widely know superstitions. A black cat crossing your path is a foreboding omen of bad luck to come. Black cats aren’t always a bad sign though! In England if a black cat crosses your path on your wedding day, it’s a sign of a lasting union. Keeping a black cat on board a ship was seen as good luck. Maybe because it kept the rat population down…
  • Looking For Rain? – Keep an eye out for dogs eating grass or rolling in the dust! A sure omen for rain.

  • Don’t Say Pig At Sea – Due to their cloven feet sailors believe that pigs are cohorts of the Devil. They believe that even uttering the animal’s name on board a ship is bad luck!
  • The Dog Test Of Character – Dogs are said to have the supernatural ability to smell out people that are up to no good. Superstition holds that if a dog growls or is constantly uneasy around someone, they are a person of bad character.
  • Dog Licks For Good Luck – The Romans and Greeks held superstitions that dog saliva had the ability to heal wounds. It’s also not uncommon to hear about the belief that if a dog licks a newborn baby, it will be a quick healer!
  • Grey Horses For The Wedding Day – Seeing a grey horse on the wedding day means the bride and groom will have good luck!
  • Just Talking About Rabbits Is Lucky – In Britain an old superstition holds that before going to bed on the last day of the last month, one should say “rabbit, rabbit, rabbit”. Upon waking the next morning and the first of a new month say, “hare, hare, hare” and you’ve just secured yourself a month of good fortune!
  • Good Luck Spider – Contrary to most all humans instincts, spiders are always good luck!
  • Toads for Burglars – Old thieve’s superstitions hold that carrying a toad in your pocket will keep you from getting caught. Maybe moving gently to keep from squashing the toad makes you stealthy?
  • Dogs and the Afterlife – Many old cultures believe that dogs help guide humans to the afterlife, taking them on the path to heaven. Killing a dog would mean there would be no path to heaven.
  • Cats And Cradles – There are two dominant superstitions here. The most common holds that if a cat gets into a cradle it will steal the babies breath. In Russia, however, keeping a cat in the cradle helps to scare off evil spirits!

Are animals superstitious too? Check out this to see how pets develop their weird behaviors – and it may be your fault!

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April Is National Pet Month – Celebrate With Us!

April is National Pet Month! You may be asking yourself, “What does that mean exactly?” Well it’s not just a month for pet pampering, but also for raising awareness about pet related issues! April is the month to be reminded of all the amazing ways pets impact our lives and how we can make theirs better. Below are some ways you can participate in the National Pet Month. Do you have your own April ritual to celebrate pets? Share it with us!

April Pet Awareness!

  • Support pet adoptions – Do your best to raise awareness for pet adoptions and provide loving homes to many abandoned and abused animals looking for a “forever home”. Can’t adopt one yourself? Many shelters struggle to make ends meet under growing population of homeless animals. April donations of food, treats, toys, and medicine can mean a lot toward ensuring that these pets get the best care when they are in the worst sit
  • Volunteer! – April 12-18 is also National Volunteer Week. Ask your local pet shelter if they could use some extra help with Spring cleaning or other duties! Sometimes the regular staff could use a little extra help or some much deserved time off.
  • Support pet responsibility – Help prevent overpopulated shelters by being an advocate for spay and neuter! Go one step further by raising awareness about the cost and responsibility associated with pet ownership. Informed people are less likely to get in over their heads with a pet and more likely to understand their pets unique needs!
  • Pay tribute to service animals – There are many charities out there that pay tribute to service animals; animals that were injured in the line of duty, or have reached the age of retirement. Consider donating or volunteering at one of these facilities. Service dogs range from those that help the blind to dogs that accompany firemen or police officers. Their dedication to humanity is something that deserves recognition all year long, not just April!
  • Promote the benefits of pet ownership – pet ownership has many medical and social advantages, even for those who don’t require service dogs! From lowering blood-preassure to helping build responsibility and self-esteem in children, pet ownership has tons of benefits.
  • Pamper your pet! – When you’re overworked it can be easy to get frustrated with the responsibilities associated with taking care of pets. Take this month to reflect on what a positive impact your pet has on your life. Remember not to take them for granted! Give them extra treats, make time to hit the dog park or schedule play dates! If you’re too busy, consider getting a Pet Nanny to spend some extra time with your pet! Remember, you’re their whole world!

Has a pet made an impact on your life? Share it with us on our Facebook page! We’d love to hear your story!

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Dog Park Etiquette – What You Need To Know

Taking your dog to a dog park is an excellent alternative to regular people parks! Obviously, a dog park is much more pet friendly than your average park where you might deal with pet haters or nervous parents who are uncomfortable with your Fido taking an interest in their child. Just because it’s a park for dogs though, doesn’t mean there aren’t rules and an expected etiquette to ensure all pets and pet parents have the best time possible! Are you a little unsure about what’s okay and what’s not? Check out our list of etiquette and common dog park peeves.

Dog Park Etiquette

  • Know your dog – Most important dog park etiquette is that you know your dog’s preferences, behavior, and sensitivities. If your dog tends to be aggressive and protective, it may be best to keep then on a leash or in a less occupied part of the park. Never let your dog off a leash in an unfenced portion of a park – especially if they rarely listen to your commands.
  • Do Remove The Leash & Harnesses – Once in a fenced in area, always remove the leash and harness. Keeping a dog on a leash in a dog park not only negates the purpose of the park, but also poses a tripping or tangling hazard for your pet, other pets, and other patrons. In heavy play, dogs can get entangled in harnesses causing injury or fights.
  • Stay involved – Don’t just let your dog loose then go sit in the shade somewhere oblivious to what your pet’s up to. Feel free to chat with other pet owners, but never without being aware of your pet. Avoid distractions by smart phones too. Know where your dog is and what it’s doing.
  • Spay & Neuter – If your pet is not spayed or neutered, keep them on a leash or very close to you to prevent any unwelcome promiscuous behavior.
  • Play vs. Fight – Know the difference between dogs playing and dogs fighting. If you have a larger pet, make sure their play stays limited to dogs of a similar size. Dogs often don’t know their own strength and it can be easier for the larger breeds to injure the smaller ones.
  • Avoid Packs – Make sure your dog isn’t teaming up with a large pack. Even packs of normally docile and domesticated dogs can turn dangerous. Try to limit your pets playmates to no more than three at a time.
  • Clean-up Waste – Just because you’re in a dog park, doesn’t mean you don’t have to be prepared to clean up any waste your dog may leave.

  • Health Check – Make sure your pet is up to date on his or her vaccinations and not sick. Furthermore, keep your pet away from any other dogs that may be exhibiting symptoms of disease or mites.
  • No Puppies Allowed – Avoid taking a new puppy younger than twelve weeks to a dog park. They are vulnerable, often don’t have all their shots yet, and may be a target for bullies.
  • Hire a Pet Sitter – Many pet sitters are trained for dealing with dogs and are a great option if you’re not comfortable or don’t have the time to take your dog out for socializing and exercise!

Not sure if there is a dog park near you? Check out dogpark.com to find one! Remember, YOU are responsible for your pet’s actions.

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