Tag: Cats

Indoor Cats vs. Outdoor Cats – Which is Right For You?

Do you have a cat or are considering getting one? Cats are unique creatures. They love human time, but mostly they like to spend time alone. They can go both indoors and outdoors, and there are benefits to both. Would you get an indoor cat or a cat that could go both in and outdoors?

Indoor Cats

Indoor cats are easy to care. Cats love lying in the sunlit window sills or curling up on your lap for a spell. Keeping your cat inside has many benefits. It protects them from getting lost or hurt and from inclement weather and fleas and ticks. Many people prefer to have their animal indoors so they don’t have to worry about them or attend to and cuts or mishaps that might happen in the great outdoors. Cats can play inside just as well as they can outside. Do you exercise? Many cats love to watch or “help” their owners during yoga sessions or other physical activity. They may interfere or get in the way, but that is because they are curious by nature and want to see what their human is up to.

Outdoor Cats

Cats can spend hours staring out windows to watch the birds and other wildlife. Many people allow their cats outside. Cats are great hunters; so if your cat is outside, don’t be surprised if they bring you a “trophy” consisting of a bird or mouse. Cats love exploring, and most will return home for food, water, and care. There are potential hazards outdoors such as traffic, other cats and dogs and getting lost. If you have a fenced or walled area, you can let your cat out on a supervised playtime. They can be safe and still enjoy romping around the yard.

Common Cats

Both indoor and outdoor cats require a certain level of care. While they are both independent, they need food, water, shelter, and love from their owner. Care is the best thing you can do for your pet. Both indoor and outdoor cats will enjoy playing with toys and things they may find outside. Both will need regular checkups at the vet and annual vaccinations to keep them healthy and safe. Try purchasing or building an outdoor cat house where they are safely confined to a fence or house but can feel the grass or watch the birds closer.

Both types have many commonalities and benefits, so which cat would you prefer?

photo credit: Robert Couse-Baker twilight zone via photopin (license)

Bio: Sarah is the author of Crazy Pet Guy. She enjoys spending time with her pets and writing about how to take care of them and raise them well.

Diet Changes for Your Cat – What You Need to Add!

Before cats became civilized and domesticated, their primary diet consisted of raw meat. Of course, you aren’t going to let your cat out to grab a bite to eat for dinner every night, so you’ll feed him/her a commercial cat food. But what kinds are the right ones that provide a balanced and nutritious diet that your fur ball will thrive on?

Well, if you understand the 5 ways to improve their diet, you can keep your kitty happy and healthy for life.

Veggies are Good

You may think that as a carnivore, a cat only needs meat to survive. The truth is that even when they were wild they always took in some veggies by eating grass or the digested vegetation in their prey’s stomach. So, giving your kittycat a few veggies is a nice little treat. Familiarize them into your cat’s diet by mixing them into their regular cat food, or if they will have them, giving bits and pieces as treats. Some veggie suggestions are broccoli, green beans, squash, and carrots, but always make sure that meat makes up the bulk of your cat’s diet. However, a few veggies added every once in a while is a good thing.

Always Serve Cooked Meat

Yes, cats ate raw meat in the wild, and they also got parasites like worms too. Meat treats are terrific for your cat, but be safe and make sure they are well cooked.

Eggs Make Great Snacks

Eggs are a wonderful source of protein and B vitamins, and it doesn’t matter if they are sunny side up, over easy or hard boiled. Just make sure they are cooked, and you’ll be good to go.

Add Omega 3’s to Their Diet

Essential fatty acids, like Omega 3’s, are just as good for cats as they are for humans. Cold water fish are loaded with them, they are heart healthy and your cat’s fur will be silkier and shiny. Better still, research shows that they slow the spread of cancer, and if your cat has arthritis, they’ll reduce the inflammation.

… And Probiotics

If your cat has digestive problems, probiotics are the best thing you can do for them. Probiotic supplements are known for creating more effective and efficient digestion while strengthening a cat’s immune system too.

Follow the suggestions as illustrated, and you’ll see for yourself that a healthy diet means a healthy cat.

Thanks Feline Living for the great tips and infographic!

 

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Shelter Animal Adoption Tips

Pet adoption is a cause near and dear to our hearts here at Pet Nanny. We like to see every critter in a warm loving home! Anything we can do to ease the adoption process and get a shelter animal in your home, we want to do!

Cindy Grant at NoLongerWild.com has compiled the ultimate treasure trove of shelter animal adoption tips! The labor of love is really impressive! Here are some of the highlights of her work, but ultimately, we suggest you head over to her site too for the full details if you have any questions or concerns!

Shelters

Did you know there are different types of animal shelters? Each different type has its own operating procedures. You may find it helpful to know what kind your local shelter is so you know what to expect before you go there! Here are the five types Cindy identifies:

  • Municipal Animal Shelters
  • Private Full Service Non-Profit Animal Shelters
  • Non-Profit Full Service With Animal Control
  • Non-Profit With Limited Space Animal Rescue Shelters
  • Animal Rescue Groups

Need help identifying good shelters from bad ones? She helps with this too! Aside from taking note of the general well-being of the animals and their living conditions she also addresses a couple important, yet not often mentioned aspects:

  • Is the staff friendly? That’s a great sign that they are happy to help a future pet parent! However, don’t be quick to get offended as they may grill you over certain aspects of your life. They’re not there to be your friend, they’re there to ensure each pet goes to a loving and capable home so they don’t see them back at the shelter!
  • Shelter pets aren’t “free”! While shelters shouldn’t demand a “donation” with adoption, they will charge you an adoption fee. This isn’t for-profit though, so don’t get the wrong idea. This fee frequently covers the cost of spaying/neutering, shots, and other preventative care your pet received under their care. It’s important that you get an itemized list of these things so you know what your pet has had, and what it still needs before you head home!

Know What Questions To Ask About Your Shelter Animal!

Shelter pets have a history and you should find out as much as you can before you adopt. Does it have any preexisting health conditions? Why is it in the shelter to begin with? What’s it’s general temperament? Important questions you need to ask! Make yourself a list – but be prepared to answer some yourself!

 

 

photo credit: M.P.N.texan Helen via photopin (license)

Up-to-Date Food Recalls – Keeping Your Pet Safe

As pet parents, we all try our hardest to keep our fur babies safe and healthy! Sometimes that delicious food or those tasty treats aren’t so safe though… Most of us don’t have a real-time option for pet food recalls. This leaves us relying on social media or the news to find out and by then it could be too late!
Fret no more! Bookmark this page for your #1 resource for current pet food recalls courtesy of PawDiet.com.

Recalls By PawDiet.com

 What causes a food recalls?

Pet food recalls happen when the food company because aware that a batch that has left the factory may have become tainted. Sometimes they are alerted to potential issues internally, other times recalls don’t happen until the company is alerted by a concerned pet owner who has had an issue.

Sometimes these recalls occur due to contaminants – some that could be deadly. Other times because of plastic, metal, or other foreign bits could be contained in it. Sometimes it could be simply that the food was mislabeled.

 

Wedding Season: How To Include Your Pet!

June is one of the most popular months for weddings! Whether you have a wedding planned this month, or next year, we’ve got some great tips for your celebrations As a pet parent, it’s only natural to include your furry friend in the nuptials. Here are some fun and creative ways how to do so!

Your Pet + Your Wedding

  • Engagement and Wedding Photos – Be sure to find yourself a photographer that is comfortable working with pets. Pinterest is a great place for photo ideas! Find poses your pet will be comfortable with and practice them a few days before the shoot.
  • Decor – Use some pictures from that awesome photo shoot in your wedding decor! Pets look adorable on name cards for the tables at the reception, as cake toppers, or on invitations.
  • In the Ceremony – An honor reserved for only the best of behaved pets! They can walk down the aisle with you, stand to the side as a “best man” or “maid of honor”, be the ring bearer, or even accompany the flower girl! Just be sure they are well rehearsed before the wedding to avoid any mishaps!
  • Dress them up! –  Everyone else at the wedding will be looking their best, why not your pet too? Flower’s tucked around their collar, ankle cuffs, and even flower crowns! Check with your local groomer to see if they offer any extra services for making your pet shine!
  • Get a Pet Nanny – This might be the most important piece of advice for pets in a wedding. It’s your big day, but your future spouse deserves your full attention, as do your many guests! Be sure to have a trusted Pet Nanny looking out for your pet’s needs and keeping them out of trouble!

photo credit: IQRemix Shiba Inu all Dressed up via photopin (license)

Cookout Pet Safety For Your Summer Vacation

Most schools have let out for the year by now – that means summer is about to get into full swing! A favorite family and community pass time for ages have been the summer cookout. Lawn chairs, cool drinks, colorful dresses, and lots of grilling! Do you know how to keep your pet safe?

Cookout Pet Threats

  • Hot grills and fire pits – Most cats and dogs know better than to sniff around too closely to something that’s on fire, but sometimes the smell of those unattended burgers can be too much for them to bear! All reason goes out the window as they decide it’s worth the risk. Make sure someone is keeping a close eye on the food at all times!
  • Hazardous foods – While most foods found at a cookout might not kill your pet, they could cause some serious stomach upset, especially if they aren’t used to such foods. Onions and avocados are two bellyachers as well as all those preservatives and salt found in chips and hot dogs. Let guests know you’d rather they not feed your pet, or better yet, keep your pets sequestered elsewhere while the bulk of the food is going around!
  • Lawn games – Sometimes cookouts include horseshoes, volleyball, badminton, or other yard sport. An over anxious pet can easily get in the way of participants injuring both them and the guests. Chewing on abandoned lawn toys can pose a choking hazard too.
  • Candles and torches – Keep your pets away from tables with candles or tiki torches to prevent a fire hazard.
  • Strange people – Pets that aren’t used to large groups can become over excited or nervous during cookouts. Especially if there are loud noises like music or fireworks involved too. If your pet is familiar with most of the guests or easily excitable leave them at home or put them inside somewhere with some water, food, and toys of their own. DO NOT LEAVE THEM IN A CAR.

photo credit: frankieleon Dogs and Cats via photopin (license)

Pet Damage to Your Home? Learn How To Stop/Prevent It!

There is a reason why landlords require extra pet deposits! Pet damage to homes and their content is a given. It may be given but it doesn’t mean you should give up! There are lots of ways you can minimize or even prevent any real damage from occurring.  Pets are a responsibility. Part of that responsibility is properly training them for their environment and helping them channel their animal instincts in a non-destructive ways. Let’s take a look at what you can do to…

Prevent Pet Damage To Your Home

  • Know Your Pet – Are they a chewer? A digger? A pee’er? A scratcher? All the above? Identify what your pet’s damage of choice is. You also need to understand that many of these issues will be harder to control the younger your pet is. Be prepared for this and nip bad habits in the bud!
  • Stimulate Them – Pets get bored. Especially young ones. It’s important that you invest a lot of time in playing with them.  It’s also important that you give them toys and an environment they can entertain themselves in. If you don’t provide one, they’ll create one themselves. Chew toys, scratch posts, digging boxes – all these can help your pet burn their energy up and stay stimulated!
  • Do They Have Separation Anxiety? – Dog trainer Allison Cipolli says,”When the owner leaves, the dog goes through a stress-panic and to comfort themselves they will grab the owner’s belongings and chew, chew, chew.”To determine if that’s the problem, Cipolli recommends putting out a special treat that your dog rarely gets, then leaving the house for a few minutes before returning.”If the dog didn’t eat what they normally would while you there,” she said, “that’s usually a telltale sign that they’re going through separation anxiety.”So what can you do about pet damage caused by anxiety? Try leaving your pet for small, yet increasing, increments of time. This allows them to adjust to the seperation. She also suggests not greeting your pet when you get home if they overly excited and have behaved poorly in your absence. Doing so just rewards them for their poor behavoir. Instead ignore them until they have calmed down, then great them and give them attention. They will learn that calm and good behavoir gets the results they want.
  • The Pee Bandit – All young pets will have issues with this until you have had time to properly train them for a litter box, puppy pad, or to go outside. Until you’ve achieved this, limit their roaming and keep a close eye on them so you can catch them before the act and redirect them. If your pet is older and exhibiting this behavior it may be territorial and can often be corrected by getting them spayed/neutered.

Gut Bacteria – Keeping Your Pet In Balance!

Do you know what “gut bacteria” is and how important of a role it plays in your pet’s health? Recent studies on the topic have pointed to the conclusion that maintaining a healthy level of good gut bacteria is a key factor for good overall health in both humans and their pets! So, what is gut bacteria and what does it do? What happens without it? What can you do to help your pet maintain the right levels? Let us teach you!

Bacteria? Good? Yup!

While stomach acid helps break down the foods you eat, thousands of tiny little microbes do the real work! These helpful little buggers neutralize toxins, kill off bad bacteria and yeasts that try to overgrow, and assist in vitamin absorption!

 “The gut is the largest immune organ in the body,” says Susan G. Wynn, DVM, a veterinary nutritionist in Atlanta

Low Population?

Several factors can affect your pet’s level of the good bacteria. The balance is frequently upset by consuming things they shouldn’t and/or picking up parasites from things they eat. Taking antibiotics can also upset the flora & fauna of their bellies. Be sure to talk to your vet about gut bacteria levels if your pet is prescribed an antibiotic. Some signs of an improper balance include vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation – though your pet can have moderately low levels for an extended period of time that will affect them in other ways like malnutrition, or low immunity.

Growing & Maintaining Your Pet’s Gut Bacteria

Maintaining your pet’s gut bacteria is the best option! You can do this by ensuring they aren’t eating a lot of human foods (especially processed ones!) and aren’t given the opportunity to consume things in the wild that may have parasites. If you’re laughing at the latter option there though, talk to your vet about temporarily introducing a probiotic specifically for your pet and breed. Probiotics can be given in the form of pills, powders, or a liquid that can be added to food. They work two ways – lowering the pH of the gut creating a healthier environment for good bacteria to flourish, and by replenishing said bacteria!
photo credit: ynaka29 Happy Laika on Bed at Taconic, Kimpton Hotel via photopin (license)

Warm Days Equal Hot Cars – Don’t Leave Pets Unattended!

Warmer temperatures are on the way and as the weather starts to warm up, many pet owners start to bring their pets out while running errands. Often times pet owners think they are doing the right thing by getting their pet out of the house, but it can be extremely harmful for the pets. Pet owners need to think twice before taking their pets on car rides, because of how dangerously hot the inside of a car gets. Within minutes, the heat inside the car can reach hazardous levels – even when it’s relatively cool outside. The following infographic displays information on keeping your pet safe during the warmer weather.

If your pet can’t come in with you on your errands, it’s best to leave them at home!

Pet Safety and Rising Temperatures created by FIGO Pet Insurance

Hairball Prevention – Because No One Wants To Clean Them Up!

Don’t be caught off-guard by an unwanted hairball being coughed up around your house this shedding season! Hairballs are likely just as unpleasant for your cat to hack up as they are for you to find. Hairball prevention day is just around the corner (April 24). Do you both a favor and prevent them before they form!

Hairball Prevention 101

  • Brush, Brush, and Brush – Cats tend to do a pretty good job of grooming themselves. We don’t think much about brushing them. While they’re shedding though a good daily brushing is a must! The more of that fur you remove with a brush, the less they ingest to hack up later! Once you’ve given them a good brushing, wipe them down with a moist cloth to pick up any extra loose fur! Heck, we’ve even used a lint roller before!
  • Medicines & Supplements – If you think your cat may already have a hairball brewing, pick up an over-the-counter “medicine” to help them pass it. These medicines are often mild laxatives and can help hair pass through your cat’s system normally. Adding extra fiber to your pet’s diet, through food or supplement, is a great preventative change you can make too!
  • Add some Olive Oil – Mix a small amount of olive oil in your cat’s food! The oil helps to lubricate their digestive system naturally. Consumption of it can also make their coat shiny! This is a short-term treatment though. Feed olive oil in moderation over short periods of time.

Hairball issues can be normal while shedding, but they shouldn’t be a regular occurrence. If you cat continually suffers from issues associated with vomiting, see your vet. There may be a more serious issue at play. Left untreated and attended too hairballs can form intestinal blockages that are very dangerous for a kitty!

photo credit: vanaddie Cats, 2003 via photopin (license)

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