How To Keep Your Canine Cozy in the Cold Months

Cozy Canine in the Cold Months

Ok, so we can all agree that Rudolph is a pretty cute reindeer, but your precious pooches definitely shouldn’t be sporting the ‘red nose’ look this fall/winter. It’s just not fetching! As it gets colder, and the bathing suits go back to the closet to collect dust, special care must be taken when keeping your canine warm. So grab something pumpkin spice related, put your feet up because we’re here to show you how you can keep your pup cozy by the fire and what to look out for to keep them out of harms way.

canine

Never…

Never ever leave your dog in the car! This one is a given, but sometimes we need a reminder that, even though we’re in a rush to get Kristen’s birthday cake at the last minute, it’s never a good idea to leave your dog in the car in the meantime. And this applies in the winter too, as the car can get very cold, very quickly, and your poor pup could be exposed to hypothermia or frostbite. Also make sure that, apart from walks, your dog is not spending too much time outside and when they are inside, make sure the house is a comfortable temperature.

Try…

Dog sweaters! This one is a little controversial, but it’s generally harmless as long as the dog is not wearing them for too long, the material is comfortable and it fits well. If you’re on a budget, then knitting your dog jumpers is a great way to save the cash and add a personal touch. This is extra fun in the holiday season and they even make great gifts! There is a whole host of options available to you online, for all budgets. So get shopping if you don’t want to end up with a chilly canine.

Do…

Check your dog’s temperature when necessary and add more protein into their diet as it gets colder. As with yourself, maintaining normal body temperature is paramount to their health and safety – if it drops below 99 degrees Fahrenheit then they are at serious risk and you must take them to the vet immediately. You can buy digital thermometers to help keep track of this (make sure they do not contain mercury) but the main thing is to keep the house at a consistent, and safe, temperature. That’s why wall mounted fireplaces tick all the boxes. They are easy to use, easy on the eyes, and safer for your dogs. This is because you can control their temperature a lot easier than you could with a traditional fire. This way, your pup isn’t at risk of overexposure to the heat, or from getting too close to a flame. So why not keep it cosy, and stylish of course, with a fireplace this winter!

Don’t hesitate to hire yourself a Pet Nanny to check in on pets during the cold months too!

Look out for…

Hypothermia and painful frostbite. After a walk, make sure to brush off any ice or water left on your canine’s coat or you run the risk of them getting ill. If your poor pup has been outside too long or the house a little too cold, then look out for the following signs and act quickly:
Anxious behavior
Non-stop shivering
Looks for warm places around the house
Seems weak
Stops moving or slows down dramatically
As long as you think of your dog’s well-being as you would your own, they’ll be happy as a pup!

Photo by Pete Bellis on Unsplash

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